Discussion:
need advice on choosing a major
(too old to reply)
s
2007-08-27 03:48:30 UTC
Permalink
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.

My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.

Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?

I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor earning 100K or
atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure track position by
publishing sufficiently in Ph.D. The advantages are job security as I
plan to go for State universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in
a area where cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be
adopted if I go for a B.S. in Management, then Ph.D in the same field.
Or, just a B.S. in Management, working for three years for a reputed
company, then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can make me
eligible for the 100K range at 25.

Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a good college
can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.

Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about 19
which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could start
at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.

Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.

Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a
real estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one to
reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows proper
people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure mark in
middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting one's business
looks dicy.

http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager for
a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified nurses
anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local govt.
clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties. Some are
valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less at
31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.) Some
reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and some
experience at 26.

I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six figure mark in U.S.
according to general reports, but considering that only 30% of the
population have a B.S. or above, it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our
country who have a degree earn in six figures and average household
income seems about 200K in an area like Binghamton for a family in
twenties having both members of family working, excluding other part
time jobs people do(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites
etc.)
but looking at the thread it seems people without a degree can also
make it. Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating
the average salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than
salary(sort of fixed income).

As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any
advice.

I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in
today's age with a proper
degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I am
indeed interested in those fields.

I hope I am not considered a mercenary. I was just trying to weigh my
options, to ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.

Thanks a lot.
Rod Speed
2007-08-27 05:47:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
I've never agree with that last, I think its MUCH more important
to choose something you like since you will be doing it for a long
time, than to concentrate on fairly high monetary compensation.

Its mad to be spending 40+ years doing what you dont like doing
just because it produces a higher income. You'll be spending more
of your hours doing that work than anything else in your life.
Post by s
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure
salary right after college in areas like Binghamton, NY
where the cost of living is moderate?
The only way to do that with any certainty is prostitution, literally.

And that wont last for very long.
Post by s
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years
at 20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years,
then start with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor
earning 100K or atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure
track position by publishing sufficiently in Ph.D.
You wont get tenure straight out of college.
Post by s
The advantages are job security as I plan to go for State universities,
high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in a area where cost of living is
reasonable. The same method can be adopted if I go for a B.S.
in Management, then Ph.D in the same field. Or, just a B.S. in
Management, working for three years for a reputed company,
then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can
make me eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a
good college can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Unlikely.
Post by s
Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about
19 which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could
start at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure salary.
Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a real
estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one to
reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows proper
people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure mark in
middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting one's business
looks dicy.
It does however have much more potential income wise.
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager
for a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified
nurses anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local
govt. clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties.
Doesnt mean that many/most manage that tho.
Post by s
Some are valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less
at 31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.)
Some reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and
some experience at 26.
I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six
figure mark in U.S. according to general reports,
And a MUCH smaller percentage get that straight out of college.
Post by s
but considering that only 30% of the population have a B.S. or above,
it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our country who have a degree earn in
six figures and average household income seems about 200K in an
area like Binghamton for a family in twenties having both members
of family working, excluding other part time jobs people do
(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites etc.) but looking
at the thread it seems people without a degree can also make it.
Yes, most obviously in small business.
Post by s
Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure revenues
if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating the average
salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any advice.
Many of them are more interested in minimising
their costs than producing that sort of income.
Post by s
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in today's
age with a proper degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.)
reach the six figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I
am indeed interested in those fields.
I hope I am not considered a mercenary.
That is precisely what you are.
Post by s
I was just trying to weigh my options, to
ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.
There arent just those two alternatives, 6 figure income straight
out of college and a low income which makes it hard to avoid debt.

And some debt isnt undesirable, most obviously with housing
purchase that is much more frugal than renting most of the time.
s
2007-08-27 21:58:20 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Post by s
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
I've never agree with that last, I think its MUCH more important
to choose something you like since you will be doing it for a long
time, than to concentrate on fairly high monetary compensation.
That is why I stated "the aim in life should be to do something about
one which is truly passionate and where monetary compensation is
fairly high." Perhaps, I should have highlighted the AND. I also don't
intend to go into a field which I don't like for the sake of funds as
in any field to earn quite a bit, you need to be passionate about it,
for which you have to actually like the field.
Post by s
Its mad to be spending 40+ years doing what you dont like doing
just because it produces a higher income. You'll be spending more
of your hours doing that work than anything else in your life.
Post by s
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure
salary right after college in areas like Binghamton, NY
where the cost of living is moderate?
The only way to do that with any certainty is prostitution, literally.
I was not asking about assurances or certainity. I have met actual
folks who have done that and discussed this with my high school
advisor and those folks were faculties, doctors, lawyers from a good
university. Straight after college does not mean with a undergrad
degree as you seem to have interpreted. Going to get a B.S., then Ph.D
or medicine/law degree means you are still in college(perhaps, I
should have stated grad school to clarify, but still I explained how
others did that, getting a Ph.D, medicine degree, so cannot understand
why you jumped to that conclusion)
Post by s
Post by s
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years
at 20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years,
then start with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor
earning 100K or atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure
track position by publishing sufficiently in Ph.D.
You wont get tenure straight out of college.
Typically, no one gets tenure after college. After a Ph.D, you can
start as a tenure track faculty which I what I stated. Tenure is
Associate Professor or Professor, Assistant Professor means tenure
track. I have met actual people who are like that after their Ph.D.
Again, you misunderstood me or perhaps what is difference between
tenure track and tenured faculty. You seem quite knowledgeable from
your other posts, though, in this and other groups.
Post by s
Post by s
The advantages are job security as I plan to go for State universities,
high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in a area where cost of living is
reasonable. The same method can be adopted if I go for a B.S.
in Management, then Ph.D in the same field. Or, just a B.S. in
Management, working for three years for a reputed company,
then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can
make me eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a
good college can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Unlikely.
I have met actual folks who have done that.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
This link also provides some folks like that, though you have to read
it fully. Someone there states he was earning 120K after his Ph.D in a
management field.
Post by s
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager
for a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified
nurses anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local
govt. clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties.
Doesnt mean that many/most manage that tho.
Well, if 10% of folks earn 100K or more and if only 30% have a B.S. or
above it means 33% of folks manage that and that is excluding folks in
small business/truck driver/store manager/real estate/stock market....
etc.
Post by s
Post by s
Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure revenues
if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating the average
salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any advice.
Many of them are more interested in minimising
their costs than producing that sort of income.
The primary aim of most businesses is to generate revenue while
keeping costs minimal. Walmart, Sams,Microsoft, Walgreens were not
just interested in keeping their costs low, but also expanding.
Post by s
Post by s
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in today's
age with a proper degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.)
reach the six figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I
am indeed interested in those fields.
I hope I am not considered a mercenary.
That is precisely what you are.
Again, you err. Each person is brought up in a different financial
situation. Without knowing the reasons for my desire you are hastily
concluding me to be a avaricious person. There are people in the world
who have to live with step parents, who consider such folks a pest/
burden etc. I did not want to bring out my issues as I wanted advice
on choosing a major, not describing my personal issues.
Post by s
Post by s
I was just trying to weigh my options, to
ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.
There arent just those two alternatives, 6 figure income straight
out of college and a low income which makes it hard to avoid debt.
And some debt isnt undesirable, most obviously with housing
purchase that is much more frugal than renting most of the time.
You are correct, though borrowing some funds for education is not that
bad also IMHO.

Thanks for your advice and time. I wish you did not misunderstand me.

- Show quoted text -
Rod Speed
2007-08-27 23:24:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks for your reply.
No problem.
Post by s
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I
realize the aim in life should be to do something about one which
is truly passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
I've never agreed with that last, I think its MUCH more important
to choose something you like since you will be doing it for a long
time, than to concentrate on fairly high monetary compensation.
That is why I stated "the aim in life should be to do something about one
which is truly passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high."
I was referring to that 'where monetary compensation is fairly high' bit.
Post by s
Perhaps, I should have highlighted the AND.
I would still have said the same thing, and
it isnt necessarily even possible to have both.
Post by s
I also don't intend to go into a field which I don't like for the
sake of funds as in any field to earn quite a bit, you need to be
passionate about it, for which you have to actually like the field.
Sure, but I was essentially saying that your 6 figures straight out of college is
very unlikely to be achievable at the same time as liking the field, unless you
like almost all the alternatives available to you due to your high school results.

I'm essentially saying that it makes a lot more sense to choose something
you would be happy to do for free, even if that doesnt produce a 6 figure
income straight after college. And that it isnt the straight after college
income that matters, its actually the total over your working life.
Post by s
Its mad to be spending 40+ years doing what you dont like doing
just because it produces a higher income. You'll be spending more
of your hours doing that work than anything else in your life.
Post by s
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure
salary right after college in areas like Binghamton, NY
where the cost of living is moderate?
The only way to do that with any certainty is prostitution, literally.
I was not asking about assurances or certainity.
I have met actual folks who have done that
It isnt that common at all.
Post by s
and discussed this with my high school advisor and those
folks were faculties, doctors, lawyers from a good university.
I doubt too many of those actually told you that a 6 figure
income in your first real full time job is very likely at all.
Post by s
Straight after college does not mean with a
undergrad degree as you seem to have interpreted.
No, I meant after the formal education, in the first real full time job after that.
Post by s
Going to get a B.S., then Ph.D or medicine/law degree means you are still in college
Yes.
Post by s
(perhaps, I should have stated grad school to clarify, but still
I explained how others did that, getting a Ph.D, medicine degree,
so cannot understand why you jumped to that conclusion)
I didnt jump to any conclusion and was discussing what you were discussing.
Post by s
Post by s
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor> earning 100K
And this is where its completely clear what you meant time of 6 figure income wise.
Post by s
Post by s
or atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure
track position by publishing sufficiently in Ph.D.
You wont get tenure straight out of college.
Typically, no one gets tenure after college. After a Ph.D, you
can start as a tenure track faculty which I what I stated. Tenure is
Associate Professor or Professor, Assistant Professor means tenure
track. I have met actual people who are like that after their Ph.D.
It isnt that common at all anymore.
Post by s
Again, you misunderstood me or perhaps what is
difference between tenure track and tenured faculty.
Nope, again, you have got my position completely wrong.
Post by s
You seem quite knowledgeable from your
other posts, though, in this and other groups.
Post by s
The advantages are job security as I plan to go for State universities,
high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in a area where cost of living is
reasonable. The same method can be adopted if I go for a B.S.
in Management, then Ph.D in the same field. Or, just a B.S. in
Management, working for three years for a reputed company,
then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can
make me eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a
good college can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Unlikely.
I have met actual folks who have done that.
I said UNLIKELY, not impossible.
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
This link also provides some folks like that,
Trouble is that its impossible to actually check the claim made there.
Post by s
though you have to read it fully. Someone there states he
was earning 120K after his Ph.D in a management field.
Easy to claim, lot harder to actually substantiate the claim.

And I doubt that was immediately after completing the PhD.
Post by s
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager
for a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified
nurses anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local
govt. clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties.
Doesnt mean that many/most manage that tho.
Well, if 10% of folks earn 100K or more and if only 30% have a B.S. or
above it means 33% of folks manage that and that is excluding folks in
small business/truck driver/store manager/real estate/stock market....etc.
Thats not the same thing as 6 figures straight after college
in the sense that you mean straight after college tho.

Yes, its much more feasible when you are talking about the
maximum income they ever manage, but you werent saying that.
Post by s
Post by s
Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in
calculating the average salary, as it is a business revenue,
rather than salary(sort of fixed income). As this group has
lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects of life,
how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any advice.
Many of them are more interested in minimising
their costs than producing that sort of income.
The primary aim of most businesses is to generate revenue while
keeping costs minimal. Walmart, Sams,Microsoft, Walgreens were
not just interested in keeping their costs low, but also expanding.
How most do their personal situation is quite different to that.

Its only a small subset that choose to live frugally.
Post by s
Post by s
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised
most folks in today's age with a proper degree(medicine,
law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for
that if I am indeed interested in those fields.
I hope I am not considered a mercenary.
That is precisely what you are.
Again, you err.
Nope, havent erred once.
Post by s
Each person is brought up in a different financial situation.
Irrelevant to whether you are a mercenary.
Post by s
Without knowing the reasons for my desire you are
hastily concluding me to be a avaricious person.
I didnt even mention avaricious, I clearly said mercenary.

The two words have different meanings.
Post by s
There are people in the world who have to live with step
parents, who consider such folks a pest/burden etc.
That does not mean that you actually need a 6 figure income
straight out of college in your sense, its quite feasible to live
quite well on a decent 5 figure income in that situation.
Post by s
I did not want to bring out my issues as I wanted advice
on choosing a major, not describing my personal issues.
It is however relevant to the desire for a 6 figure income
straight out of college in your sense. That stuff about
the step parents isnt relevant to that. A decent 5 figure
income straight out of college would be quite adequate
and that is likely to be better in the long term because
you are more likely to be able to find something you
enjoy doing more if you dont need the 6 figure income
straight out of college.

There's plenty of fields that wont deliver that straight out
of college and those that do often have other undesirable
associated things as a result of that 6 figure income.

A good example of that is the legal system where there
are real downsides in legal jobs that pay people just out
of college that much. It would make a lot more sense to
avoid that type of legal employment just because few
actually enjoy that very demanding situation for long.
Post by s
Post by s
I was just trying to weigh my options, to
ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.
There arent just those two alternatives, 6 figure income straight
out of college and a low income which makes it hard to avoid debt.
And some debt isnt undesirable, most obviously with housing
purchase that is much more frugal than renting most of the time.
You are correct, though borrowing some funds for education is not that bad also IMHO.
Sure, particularly with the rather generous repayment conditions available with those.
Post by s
Thanks for your advice and time. I wish you did not misunderstand me.
I didnt misunderstand anything you said.
s
2007-08-28 23:24:37 UTC
Permalink
Thanks again for your reply.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
I was not asking about assurances or certainity.
I have met actual folks who have done that
It isnt that common at all.
Agreed, it is rare, but not that rare also.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Straight after college does not mean with a
undergrad degree as you seem to have interpreted.
No, I meant after the formal education, in the first real full time job after that.
Then, why did you state "The only way to do that with any certainty is
prostitution, literally."
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
(perhaps, I should have stated grad school to clarify, but still
I explained how others did that, getting a Ph.D, medicine degree,
so cannot understand why you jumped to that conclusion)
I didnt jump to any conclusion and was discussing what you were discussing.
Again, then why did you mention "The only way to do that with any
certainty is prostitution, literally."
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
or atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure
track position by publishing sufficiently in Ph.D.
You wont get tenure straight out of college.
Typically, no one gets tenure after college. After a Ph.D, you
can start as a tenure track faculty which I what I stated. Tenure is
Associate Professor or Professor, Assistant Professor means tenure
track. I have met actual people who are like that after their Ph.D.
It isnt that common at all anymore.
Well quite a bit of of folks who finish Ph.D start as a tenure track
faculty assuming they choose to go academia and if they have done
proper work during their doctoral program.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Again, you misunderstood me or perhaps what is
difference between tenure track and tenured faculty.
Nope, again, you have got my position completely wrong.
You mentioned "You wont get tenure straight out of college. "

There are two opinions. One you thought I was stating I would start as
a Associate Professor(or above) as getting
tenure means only that, IMHO, though I mentioned Assistant Professor
which is a tenure track not tenured faculty.

Or you got the definition of tenure improperly. You are indeed
knowledgeable and willing to aid others in many groups
which is noble of you, but we all being can make errors. Anyway, that
is irrelevant to the questions and your answers are
appreciated.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
You seem quite knowledgeable from your
other posts, though, in this and other groups.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
The advantages are job security as I plan to go for State universities,
high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in a area where cost of living is
reasonable. The same method can be adopted if I go for a B.S.
in Management, then Ph.D in the same field. Or, just a B.S. in
Management, working for three years for a reputed company,
then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can
make me eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a
good college can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Unlikely.
I have met actual folks who have done that.
I said UNLIKELY, not impossible.
If I have met actual folks who have done that, it does not seem that
unlikely and neither did I mention impossible.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
This link also provides some folks like that,
Trouble is that its impossible to actually check the claim made there.
Not quite. The people in that link are lawyers, doctors, certified
nurse anesthetists,small business owners etc. Even if
you don't believe them salary.com indicates those folks might be in
that range.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
though you have to read it fully. Someone there states he
was earning 120K after his Ph.D in a management field.
Easy to claim, lot harder to actually substantiate the claim.
And I doubt that was immediately after completing the PhD.
I know someone from college with a Ph.D starting at 100K in
Binghamton, NY after his Ph.D. The person who claimed
120K might be in NYC, CA, Washington D.C. etc. There are some folks
who state after a Ph.D in hard sciences they were hired for 100K by
some tech company. Possible, considering computational biology and
other research scientist
openings required for tech labs, in an area like NYC.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager
for a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified
nurses anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local
govt. clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties.
Doesnt mean that many/most manage that tho.
Well, some people don't like to mention, some don't, but if 1/3 people
in our country with a degree mention it,
it doesn't seem that rare also, even if we are excluding tv/radio/
sports stars... etc
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
I hope I am not considered a mercenary.
That is precisely what you are.
Nope, havent erred once.
Post by s
Without knowing the reasons for my desire you are
hastily concluding me to be a avaricious person.
I didnt even mention avaricious, I clearly said mercenary.
The two words have different meanings.
Well, http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/mercenary lists mercenary
as a synonym for avaricious. The meanings are not that different.
Avaricious means someone who is greedy(can be funds, materials, food
etc.) and mercenary means
someone whose main motivation is funds. They are fairly close, though,
you were using them in the same meaning while
referring to me.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Thanks for your advice and time. I wish you did not misunderstand me.
I didnt misunderstand anything you said.
How about the differences I stated above?

Thanks again for your advice and time. Few give time and advice as
liberally as you do which is deeply appreciated.
Rod Speed
2007-08-29 00:29:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks again for your reply.
No thanks for your lack of honesty about your personal situation.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
I was not asking about assurances or certainity.
I have met actual folks who have done that
It isnt that common at all.
Agreed, it is rare, but not that rare also.
Quite rare to get that straight out of college except with prostitution.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Straight after college does not mean with a
undergrad degree as you seem to have interpreted.
No, I meant after the formal education, in the first real full time job after that.
Then, why did you state "The only way to do that with any certainty is prostitution, literally."
Because its true. There arent many at all that get a 6 figure income immediately
after formal education is completed except with prostitution and you dont need
any formal education with prostitution, just need to look presentable.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
(perhaps, I should have stated grad school to clarify, but still
I explained how others did that, getting a Ph.D, medicine degree,
so cannot understand why you jumped to that conclusion)
I didnt jump to any conclusion and was discussing what you were discussing.
Again, then why did you mention "The only way
to do that with any certainty is prostitution, literally."
See above.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
or atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure
track position by publishing sufficiently in Ph.D.
You wont get tenure straight out of college.
Typically, no one gets tenure after college. After a Ph.D, you
can start as a tenure track faculty which I what I stated. Tenure is
Associate Professor or Professor, Assistant Professor means tenure
track. I have met actual people who are like that after their Ph.D.
It isnt that common at all anymore.
Well quite a bit of of folks who finish Ph.D start as a tenure track
faculty assuming they choose to go academia and if they have
done proper work during their doctoral program.
Bugger all of those do that with a 6 figure income at that time.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Again, you misunderstood me or perhaps what is
difference between tenure track and tenured faculty.
Nope, again, you have got my position completely wrong.
You mentioned "You wont get tenure straight out of college. "
Tenure track aint tenure.
Post by s
There are two opinions.
Options/alternatives. And there arent just these two.
Post by s
One you thought I was stating I would start as a Associate Professor
(or above) as getting tenure means only that, IMHO, though I mentioned
Assistant Professor which is a tenure track not tenured faculty.
Or I was rubbing your nose in the fact that tenure track aint tenure.
Post by s
Or you got the definition of tenure improperly. You are indeed
knowledgeable and willing to aid others in many groups
which is noble of you, but we all being can make errors.
I made no error there.
Post by s
Anyway, that is irrelevant to the questions and your answers are appreciated.
Some honesty about your actual personal situation would be appreciated by us.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
The advantages are job security as I plan to go for State
universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in a area where
cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be adopted if I
go for a B.S.
in Management, then Ph.D in the same field. Or, just a B.S. in
Management, working for three years for a reputed company,
then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can
make me eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a
good college can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Unlikely.
I have met actual folks who have done that.
I said UNLIKELY, not impossible.
If I have met actual folks who have done that,
You'll have to pardon us if we want to see some evidence that they werent lying.
Post by s
it does not seem that unlikely
Corse it does when you cant actually list anyone who has actually
done that except in some irrelevant situations like when its someone's
rich relatives that choose to hire them at that rate in that situation.
Post by s
and neither did I mention impossible.
I never said you did.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
This link also provides some folks like that,
Trouble is that its impossible to actually check the claim made there.
Not quite. The people in that link are lawyers, doctors, certified nurse
anesthetists,small business owners etc. Even if you don't believe them
salary.com indicates those folks might be in that range.
Not straight out of college it doesnt.

Yes, that GP I know personally is certainly earning that
sort of money, but he wasnt doing that straight out of
college, even if he is prepared to work 80 hour weeks.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
though you have to read it fully. Someone there states he
was earning 120K after his Ph.D in a management field.
Easy to claim, lot harder to actually substantiate the claim.
And I doubt that was immediately after completing the PhD.
I know someone from college with a Ph.D starting at 100K in
Binghamton, NY after his Ph.D. The person who claimed 120K
might be in NYC, CA, Washington D.C. etc. There are some
folks who state after a Ph.D in hard sciences they were hired
for 100K by some tech company. Possible, considering
computational biology and other research scientist
openings required for tech labs, in an area like NYC.
I'd want to see some hard evidence to substantiate
that claim, because its easy to claim.

Its certainly possible in some unusual field that there are
very few qualified in, but thats not the general thing that
you were talking about and if you want to do that yourself,
its not that easy to identify a field like that to do that in.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager
for a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified
nurses anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local
govt. clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties.
Doesnt mean that many/most manage that tho.
Well, some people don't like to mention, some don't, but if 1/3 people
in our country with a degree mention it, it doesn't seem that rare also,
even if we are excluding tv/radio/sports stars... etc
Nothing like 1/3 get that straight out of college in your sense.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
I hope I am not considered a mercenary.
That is precisely what you are.
Nope, havent erred once.
Post by s
Without knowing the reasons for my desire you are
hastily concluding me to be a avaricious person.
I didnt even mention avaricious, I clearly said mercenary.
The two words have different meanings.
Well, http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/mercenary
lists mercenary as a synonym for avaricious.
The two words arent perfectly matching sets.
Post by s
The meanings are not that different.
Different enough tho.
Post by s
Avaricious means someone who is greedy (can be funds, materials, food
etc.) and mercenary means someone whose main motivation is funds.
So clearly quite different.
Post by s
They are fairly close, though,
Nope, just similar, but different.
Post by s
you were using them in the same meaning while referring to me.
I didnt even use the word avaricious at all.

You are clearly mercenary, but not necessarily avaricious.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Thanks for your advice and time. I wish you did not misunderstand me.
I didnt misunderstand anything you said.
How about the differences I stated above?
No misunderstanding at all, even now that its been discussed in more detail.
Post by s
Thanks again for your advice and time. Few give time and
advice as liberally as you do which is deeply appreciated.
No problem.
John Weiss
2007-08-29 00:54:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Then, why did you state "The only way to do that with any certainty is
prostitution, literally."
You are obviously new here, to question "why" rodless speedless says anything
at all... He's just the resident troll who likes to get people riled up. He's
best ignored.
Post by s
Well quite a bit of of folks who finish Ph.D start as a tenure track
faculty assuming they choose to go academia and if they have done
proper work during their doctoral program.
OTOH, a tenure track seldom means making $100K+ right after graduation (as you
stipulated). Even tenure track faculty has to "pay their dues" and work their
way up the ladder. If you don't publish enough or pull in enough research
grants, your tenure track may well be derailed, too...
Post by s
Post by s
Post by s
The advantages are job security as I plan to go for State universities,
high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in a area where cost of living is
reasonable. The same method can be adopted if I go for a B.S.
in Management, then Ph.D in the same field. Or, just a B.S. in
Management, working for three years for a reputed company,
then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can
make me eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a
good college can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
I have met actual folks who have done that.
If I have met actual folks who have done that, it does not seem that
unlikely and neither did I mention impossible.
"Actual folks" have done a LOT of things that you are unlikely to achieve.
Just following [one of] their general education paths will NOT establish a high
probability of "instant success" for yourself. You would have to figure out
what gave them "the edge" to succeed where others have failed or achieved
"average success." You would then have to figure out how YOU can gain a
similar "edge" that makes you stand out from the crowd.

For example, a BS in Management from a state U will get you a place in line
with THOUSANDS of other similarly [un]qualified graduates for entry-level jobs
in corporate America. An MBA from Harvard MIGHT get you a spot at the head of
a couple of those lines for a high-paying job somewhere. However, if you had
an unremarkable job/internship histroy while in school, and/or an unremarkable
thesis/project, you're unlikely to grab one of the few $100K entry-level jobs
available. IMO, a PhD in Management will be essentially useless outside
academia until you get some real-world experience, so that still fails your
"instant success" test as well.

BTW, since you say you will be going for State universities, which of them are
also included in the "top 10 campuses" you mention? Which "reputed companies"
recruit intensively from that small subset, and from which curriculums? Of the
people they recruit, what percentage makes $100K within 3 or 4 years? What
jobs do they hold? What made them stand out in the first place?

So, in general, you first have to decide which of the several fields you
mentioned you want to pursue as an undergraduate degree. Then you have to
excel in your undergraduate curriculum. You MAY have to target your curriculum
and other activities to the specific companies you discuss above. You will get
an indicator of your potential short-term "success" when you start looking at
graduate schools -- via both your GRE/GMAT/LSAT... test results and by how many
scholarships / fellowships / assistantships you are offered. You will get a
further indicator when you start interviewing for jobs, and find out how many
firms call you back for a second look, and for what kinds of jobs. After all,
you WILL be looking at both options -- immediate graduate school and immediate
employment -- won't you?

Assuming, then, that the graduate schools are interested in you, you will have
to decide again which of them you want to pursue, based on their various
curriculum offerings. Will you choose a law school after a BS in Biology, or
an immediate MS/CNA program after a BS in Nursing, Medical school after a BS in
Management, or...

I, too, know many people making over $100K. I know NONE who started at that
level, and can't readily think of any who made $100K at age 25. Of course,
inflation might work in your favor...
Post by s
Post by s
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
The people in that link are lawyers, doctors, certified
nurse anesthetists,small business owners etc. Even if
you don't believe them salary.com indicates those folks might be in
that range.
Indeed, many people in those fields make >$100K. I suppose a FEW high-flight
lawyers, doctors, realtors, stockbrokers, etc. made that GROSS in their first
full year of professional practice. However, no specialist MD will start that
at age 25, since internship and residency requirements will keep him in the
"student" category for a LONG time! To give you a real-life example, my
brother-in-law got a PhD in Biomechanical Engiheering, then went to medical
school, then decided to specialize in Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesiology. He
finally "hung out his shingle" at age 42! Indeed, he made (and still makes)
good $$ at Cedars Sinai, but can you imagine how much $$ he spent in living and
education expenses for over 20 years?!? Family money is a great thing!
Post by s
I know someone from college with a Ph.D starting at 100K in
Binghamton, NY after his Ph.D. The person who claimed
120K might be in NYC, CA, Washington D.C. etc. There are some folks
who state after a Ph.D in hard sciences they were hired for 100K by
some tech company. Possible, considering computational biology and
other research scientist
openings required for tech labs, in an area like NYC.
Waitaminutehere!!! Now you're mixing those apples with oranges! You said you
were looking at a "reasonable" cost of living area -- NOT NYC or DC! Again, a
single example of someone starting at that salary in Binghamton does not even
come close to raising the probability that you will achieve that! What is his
job? What were his credentials? How many other jobs like that exist in
Binghamton? How many come open every year? Will YOU get "the edge" to qualify
for one of those openings? Will it come available the year you finish your
PhD?

Another of my brothers-in-law made it a goal to make $100K/yr before he was 40,
and made it a point to mention it to my Grandmother. He achieved his goal. He
also achieved a heart attack at 52, and a medical retirement at 53. Be careful
of what you wish for...
Logan Shaw
2007-08-27 06:09:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology.
You're in luck. Those are all good fields. And you can combine
several of them. For example, computational biology is a great
field. And of course you can do patent law relating to biology
or computers.
Post by s
I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
That's a good aim for a career, although that's not necessarily
the same thing as an aim in life (although that may not really
be what you meant).
Post by s
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I strongly advise against making a career decision by putting so much
weight into how soon you can reach $100,000/yr. I advise against it
for two reasons.

The first is that while it's perfectly possible to achieve, you may
find yourself stressed out and hating life, especially if you
sacrifice other things of value to get there. I'd much rather have
$80,000/yr and enjoy life than have $100,000/yr and hate it.

The second reason I advise against it is that even if your goal is
to make as much money as possible, for purely practical reasons you
should potentially avoid optimizing for making the most money early
in your career. You can't optimize for everything at once, and
24 or 25 is very early in your career. You need to be thinking
in terms of decades, not just a few years. The best career is the
one that has the best prospects over its entire course, not just
at the beginning. Even if all you cared about was money, you should
still be worrying about what has the most long-term growth potential,
because believe me, it would be fairly frustrating to hit $100,000
at age 25 and never be able to rise above that at age 45. There
are even some careers where advancement isn't easy *and* older people
tend to make less than younger people. In my opinion, that's something
you want to account for in your planning.

Whatever you decide to do, good luck. You have a lot of time ahead of
you, and it sounds like you are motivated to do something worthwhile
with it.

- Logan
h***@hotmail.com
2007-08-27 12:57:22 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 01:09:29 -0500, Logan Shaw
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology.
You're in luck. Those are all good fields. And you can combine
several of them. For example, computational biology is a great
field. And of course you can do patent law relating to biology
or computers.
Post by s
I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
That's a good aim for a career, although that's not necessarily
the same thing as an aim in life (although that may not really
be what you meant).
Post by s
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I strongly advise against making a career decision by putting so much
weight into how soon you can reach $100,000/yr. I advise against it
for two reasons.
The first is that while it's perfectly possible to achieve, you may
find yourself stressed out and hating life, especially if you
sacrifice other things of value to get there. I'd much rather have
$80,000/yr and enjoy life than have $100,000/yr and hate it.
The second reason I advise against it is that even if your goal is
to make as much money as possible, for purely practical reasons you
should potentially avoid optimizing for making the most money early
in your career. You can't optimize for everything at once, and
24 or 25 is very early in your career. You need to be thinking
in terms of decades, not just a few years. The best career is the
one that has the best prospects over its entire course, not just
at the beginning. Even if all you cared about was money, you should
still be worrying about what has the most long-term growth potential,
because believe me, it would be fairly frustrating to hit $100,000
at age 25 and never be able to rise above that at age 45. There
are even some careers where advancement isn't easy *and* older people
tend to make less than younger people. In my opinion, that's something
you want to account for in your planning.
Whatever you decide to do, good luck. You have a lot of time ahead of
you, and it sounds like you are motivated to do something worthwhile
with it.
- Logan
Good answers for an interesting question. Judging from the skill
level of the OP in forming a cogent post, the high school might be
better than most.

A couple of points to ponder:

A salary is only one source of income. The person who minimizes
expenses and maximizes investments can often reach retirement with
more money than someone with a high salary and little financial
discipline or savvy. Stories of janitors bequesting millions to
schools might be rare, but they do exist.

Incurring huge debt at the beginning of a career can be
counter-productive, especially if a change of careers is made
midstream, or a life situation changes.

I think that many high school grads get the cart before the horse. If
I were to do it over, and I was going that general route...

I would take courses on financial management and learn to understand
the markets, economy, and effects of driving forces before anything
else.

I would play the online stock market games multiple ways until I lost
the gambling urge or realized I needed someone else to make my
investments.

I would seek out and apprentice (for free) to the smartest people I
could, in the fields of my interest, for at least four months per
field.

I would absolutely minimize expenses and begin a savings/investment
program. I wouldn't give, donate, or tithe until I had reached a
first financial goal.

I would absolutely work at a job, no matter how low paying, just to
learn the interactions and the bureaucracy.

Only after six months to a year of doing this would I consider
investing money in college or finalizing career choice decisions.

Once I had finalized a career choice, I would be contacting potential
employers before entering college, making the contacts and mining for
information. By the end of the first year of college, I would have
the top three employers scoped out and stay in regular contact until
graduation.

I would stay single and refuse to even entertain the notion of a
serious relationship, no matter how enticing.

I would pay serious attention to the dress codes of the successful,
and any other social musts that they might teach by example.

I would spend at least one week a year alone, camping and reflecting,
without the distrations of tv, radio, cell phones, music, or all the
other stuff that interrupts thoughts.
s
2007-08-27 22:17:48 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the reply.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Good answers for an interesting question. Judging from the skill
level of the OP in forming a cogent post, the high school might be
better than most.
Thanks for considering my high school a proper one.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
A salary is only one source of income. The person who minimizes
expenses and maximizes investments can often reach retirement with
more money than someone with a high salary and little financial
discipline or savvy. Stories of janitors bequesting millions to
schools might be rare, but they do exist.
Agreed, but to invest you need to have finances. As there are folks
who want to invest, but cannot do that as they have a family to
support, house, car loans. House is an investment, but not like real
estate, stocks, bonds other methods which you have well explained.
Hence, my desire to start with a decent salary and 100K is not that
high with inflation and deflation of dollar.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Incurring huge debt at the beginning of a career can be
counter-productive, especially if a change of careers is made
midstream, or a life situation changes.
Agreed again, but I don't plan to change careers hence want to weigh
the choices, before I embark on the journey.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I think that many high school grads get the cart before the horse. If
I were to do it over, and I was going that general route...
I would take courses on financial management and learn to understand
the markets, economy, and effects of driving forces before anything
else.
Well said again. But, courses on financial management can be taken in
college and those subjects can be studied with teachers also.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would play the online stock market games multiple ways until I lost
the gambling urge or realized I needed someone else to make my
investments.
This seems risky like playing poker online. Without understanding
ROI(Return of Investment) it seems improper for me to indulge in that
and presently I have no monetary means also for that.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would seek out and apprentice (for free) to the smartest people I
could, in the fields of my interest, for at least four months per
field.
For that you need to have chosen a field, after college, presumably.
And, I am not the only one in race. Lots of IT majors want to intern
in Microsoft, but they have to be the brightest to get there. An IT
major cannot intern there, even if he wants to volunteer.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would absolutely minimize expenses and begin a savings/investment
program. I wouldn't give, donate, or tithe until I had reached a
first financial goal.
Thanks again. But, minimize expenses can save you only certain extent.
The people who become financially independent are folks who have some
amount to invest.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would absolutely work at a job, no matter how low paying, just to
learn the interactions and the bureaucracy.
That can be done, as a summer intern while at a college.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Only after six months to a year of doing this would I consider
investing money in college or finalizing career choice decisions.
But, that looks make you look like someone who could not make up his
mind and required 6-12 months to think over. Moreover, some grants
require you to join college promptly after high school(atleast that is
what I heard).
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Once I had finalized a career choice, I would be contacting potential
employers before entering college, making the contacts and mining for
information. By the end of the first year of college, I would have
the top three employers scoped out and stay in regular contact until
graduation.
Truly bright ideas. I will keep these in mind.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would stay single and refuse to even entertain the notion of a
serious relationship, no matter how enticing.
Fully accurate. Not only is it time consuming at a stage of your life,
when career is important, but takes up economic resources also.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would pay serious attention to the dress codes of the successful,
and any other social musts that they might teach by example.
Verily, wise suggestions.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would spend at least one week a year alone, camping and reflecting,
without the distrations of tv, radio, cell phones, music, or all the
other stuff that interrupts thoughts.- Hide quoted text -
I have already done that.

Thanks a lot for your advice and time.
Rod Speed
2007-08-27 23:56:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks for the reply.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Good answers for an interesting question. Judging from the skill
level of the OP in forming a cogent post, the high school might be
better than most.
Thanks for considering my high school a proper one.
Its more likely not the school so much as the individual.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
A salary is only one source of income. The person who minimizes
expenses and maximizes investments can often reach retirement with
more money than someone with a high salary and little financial
discipline or savvy. Stories of janitors bequesting millions to
schools might be rare, but they do exist.
Agreed, but to invest you need to have finances.
Nope, what its about is a high level of savings to produce what can
be used to produce those investments, at a time when you dont have
much call on your income because you dont have a wife and kids yet.

The main problem is that most kids dont even consider doing that while they can.
Post by s
As there are folks who want to invest, but cannot do that as they
have a family to support, house, car loans. House is an investment,
but not like real estate, stocks, bonds other methods which you have
well explained. Hence, my desire to start with a decent salary
A 6 figure income straight out of college is rather more than that.
Post by s
and 100K is not that high with inflation and deflation of dollar.
Its still not that common straight out of college in your sense and you
dont need that sort of income to be able to do what he is talking about.

And it isnt just the income that matters either. I had a real standard
of living quite a bit higher than the boss of the place I was working for,
who was earning quite a bit more than your 6 figure income, because
I was both working in a well paid professional job, and was physically
building my house at the same time in a country where the value of
the house was tax free income.

I was also making a lot of money on the stockmarket at the same time
and in fact chose to not use any of my money for the house, because
I was earning more on the stock market than I was paying in interest.

And that was straight out of college in your sense,
the first full time job after completing the higher degree.

I was also involved in small business as well.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Incurring huge debt at the beginning of a career can be
counter-productive, especially if a change of careers is
made midstream, or a life situation changes.
Agreed again, but I don't plan to change careers
Few do, but a very high percentage do anyway.
Post by s
hence want to weigh the choices, before I embark on the journey.
Its quite hard to be clear how much you will like the real world of
the choice you make. The real downside with most professional
jobs isnt that obvious when seen from high school.

It wasnt that obvious to me that the main downside of the job above
was the mindless bureaucracy that any large organisation involves.

Turns out that I found it easy enough to bypass
that completely, but many arent so fortunate.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I think that many high school grads get the cart before the horse.
If I were to do it over, and I was going that general route...
I would take courses on financial management and learn to understand
the markets, economy, and effects of driving forces before anything else.
Well said again. But, courses on financial management can be taken
in college and those subjects can be studied with teachers also.
And you dont necessarily need courses either. I never bothered and did fine without them.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would play the online stock market games multiple ways until I lost the
gambling urge or realized I needed someone else to make my investments.
This seems risky like playing poker online.
Nope.
Post by s
Without understanding ROI (Return of Investment)
it seems improper for me to indulge in that
That's not what its about.
Post by s
and presently I have no monetary means also for that.
Its always easy to fix that.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would seek out and apprentice (for free) to the smartest people I
could, in the fields of my interest, for at least four months per field.
Its not clear to me that that really does allow you
to see the real downsides in a particular field.

For example the problem with most small business
is the paperwork involved and the hours involved.
Post by s
For that you need to have chosen a field, after college, presumably.
Nope, he's suggesting that you try that with the fields that interest you.
Post by s
And, I am not the only one in race. Lots of IT majors want to intern
in Microsoft, but they have to be the brightest to get there. An IT
major cannot intern there, even if he wants to volunteer.
Thats just one operation.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would absolutely minimize expenses and begin a savings/investment program.
I wouldn't give, donate, or tithe until I had reached a first financial goal.
Thanks again. But, minimize expenses can save you only certain extent.
You get to save that stuff in his list.
Post by s
The people who become financially independent
are folks who have some amount to invest.
Nope, they just use other people's money.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would absolutely work at a job, no matter how low
paying, just to learn the interactions and the bureaucracy.
That can be done, as a summer intern while at a college.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Only after six months to a year of doing this would I consider
investing money in college or finalizing career choice decisions.
But, that looks make you look like someone who could not
make up his mind and required 6-12 months to think over.
Doesnt matter what it looks like, that ensure you arent wasting your
substantial college costs on what you later decide isnt an ideal field anymore.
Post by s
Moreover, some grants require you to join college
promptly after high school(atleast that is what I heard).
Its worth ignoring those, tho I must admit I didnt do it the way he suggests myself.

In many ways I lucked out tho, I got formally qualified in the hard
sciences and the post graduate research degree involved using
computers to do what couldnt be done without them, at a time
when there wasnt any formal college computer courses at all.

So in effect I did change course radically because I decided that
there was much more future in computing than the hard sciences.

I did however get employed due to the hard science qualifications
and morphed over into computing in that organisation.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Once I had finalized a career choice, I would be contacting potential
employers before entering college, making the contacts and mining for
information. By the end of the first year of college, I would have the top
three employers scoped out and stay in regular contact until graduation.
Truly bright ideas. I will keep these in mind.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would stay single and refuse to even entertain the
notion of a serious relationship, no matter how enticing.
Fully accurate. Not only is it time consuming at a stage of your life,
when career is important, but takes up economic resources also.
Not necessarily, most obviously when both are doing the same thing.
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would pay serious attention to the dress codes of the successful,
and any other social musts that they might teach by example.
Verily, wise suggestions.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would spend at least one week a year alone, camping and
reflecting, without the distrations of tv, radio, cell phones,
music, or all the other stuff that interrupts thoughts.
I have already done that.
Doesnt appeal to me, particularly no books.
Post by s
Thanks a lot for your advice and time.
s
2007-08-28 23:34:30 UTC
Permalink
Thanks again for your reply.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Thanks for considering my high school a proper one.
Its more likely not the school so much as the individual.
Thanks.
Post by Rod Speed
And it isnt just the income that matters either. I had a real standard
of living quite a bit higher than the boss of the place I was working for,
who was earning quite a bit more than your 6 figure income, because
I was both working in a well paid professional job, and was physically
building my house at the same time in a country where the value of
the house was tax free income.
I was also making a lot of money on the stockmarket at the same time
and in fact chose to not use any of my money for the house, because
I was earning more on the stock market than I was paying in interest.
And that was straight out of college in your sense,
the first full time job after completing the higher degree.
I was also involved in small business as well.
That is possible, in your case you might be earning funds through
three means(job, stock market, business) and their sum might be more
than 100K(with all due respect just for the sake of an example). I
intend to earn through one position, in my choice of fields, as it is
unlikely I may have time, in fields which need 80-90hrs work per week,
to start a business or invest in stock market. Some folks in my class
want to have the first job after college as a 40hr one for 40K, then
earn the 60K through stocks and small business using the remaining
free time they have.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would play the online stock market games multiple ways until I lost the
gambling urge or realized I needed someone else to make my investments.
This seems risky like playing poker online.
Nope.
Then what did he intend?
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Without understanding ROI (Return of Investment)
it seems improper for me to indulge in that
That's not what its about.
Then what is it about?
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
For that you need to have chosen a field, after college, presumably.
Nope, he's suggesting that you try that with the fields that interest you.
Post by s
And, I am not the only one in race. Lots of IT majors want to intern
in Microsoft, but they have to be the brightest to get there. An IT
major cannot intern there, even if he wants to volunteer.
Thats just one operation.
Most fields are like that, IMHO. If you are not the best in a field,
unlikely that best folks in your field will want to
work with you, IMHO.

. > >> I would absolutely minimize expenses and begin a savings/
investment program.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I wouldn't give, donate, or tithe until I had reached a first financial goal.
Thanks again. But, minimize expenses can save you only certain extent.
You get to save that stuff in his list.
Indeed.
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
The people who become financially independent
are folks who have some amount to invest.
Nope, they just use other people's money.
But, that means you are financially knowledgeable enough else may end
up filing bankruptcy.


Thanks a lot again for your advice and time.- Hide quoted text -
Rod Speed
2007-08-29 00:40:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
And it isnt just the income that matters either. I had a real standard
of living quite a bit higher than the boss of the place I was working
for, who was earning quite a bit more than your 6 figure income,
because I was both working in a well paid professional job, and was
physically building my house at the same time in a country where the
value of the house was tax free income.
I was also making a lot of money on the stockmarket at the same time
and in fact chose to not use any of my money for the house, because
I was earning more on the stock market than I was paying in interest.
And that was straight out of college in your sense,
the first full time job after completing the higher degree.
I was also involved in small business as well.
That is possible, in your case you might be earning funds
through three means(job, stock market, business)
Much of it was actually the tax free income as a result of physically building the house.
Post by s
and their sum might be more than 100K(with all due respect just for the sake of an example).
I intend to earn through one position, in my choice of fields,
as it is unlikely I may have time, in fields which need 80-90hrs
work per week, to start a business or invest in stock market.
Its quite doable.
Post by s
Some folks in my class want to have the first job after college
as a 40hr one for 40K, then earn the 60K through stocks and
small business using the remaining free time they have.
And I was just pointing out that that is a viable route which worked fine for me.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I would play the online stock market games multiple ways until I
lost the gambling urge or realized I needed someone else to make
my investments.
This seems risky like playing poker online.
Nope.
Then what did he intend?
I just meant its nothing like that risky if you know what you are doing.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
Without understanding ROI (Return of Investment)
it seems improper for me to indulge in that
That's not what its about.
Then what is it about?
Working out what the economy is going to do and what stocks will benefit from that.
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
For that you need to have chosen a field, after college, presumably.
Nope, he's suggesting that you try that with the fields that interest you.
Post by s
And, I am not the only one in race. Lots of IT majors want to intern
in Microsoft, but they have to be the brightest to get there. An IT
major cannot intern there, even if he wants to volunteer.
Thats just one operation.
Most fields are like that, IMHO.
Nope, particularly small business isnt.
Post by s
If you are not the best in a field, unlikely that best
folks in your field will want to work with you, IMHO.
Its MUCH more complicated than that with an unemployment rate of 4.x%
Post by s
Post by Rod Speed
Post by s
The people who become financially independent
are folks who have some amount to invest.
Nope, they just use other people's money.
But, that means you are financially knowledgeable
enough else may end up filing bankruptcy.
Sure. And some of the richest people have done that in their past.

There's a real sense in which its one way to become financially knowledgeable.
Post by s
Thanks a lot again for your advice and time.
Rick
2007-08-29 04:57:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks for the reply.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Good answers for an interesting question. Judging from the skill
level of the OP in forming a cogent post, the high school might be
better than most.
Thanks for considering my high school a proper one.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
A salary is only one source of income. The person who minimizes
expenses and maximizes investments can often reach retirement with
more money than someone with a high salary and little financial
discipline or savvy. Stories of janitors bequesting millions to
schools might be rare, but they do exist.
Agreed, but to invest you need to have finances. As there are folks
who want to invest, but cannot do that as they have a family to
support, house, car loans. House is an investment, but not like real
estate, stocks, bonds other methods which you have well explained.
Hence, my desire to start with a decent salary and 100K is not that
high with inflation and deflation of dollar.
Not meaning to deflate your ego, but what makes you think you will have
anything to offer worth $100,000.00 to an employer fresh out of college
with no work experience?

Your concept of a salary as "not that high" in a world where corporate
profits rule is slightly out of line with the reality of the job market.
If it can be done overseas, that's where the job is. If it can be done
for less, someone else gets your $100,000.00 job for $60,000.00 a year.
Bear in mind that while it is clear you are looking out for your self
interest, people interviewing you in personnel are looking out not only
for their own job - which is hiring the best while keeping costs down,
but for the corporate interests they serve as well. Handing out
$100,000.00 starting salaries generally isn't in line with that
corporate concept, unless you really, REALLY have something to offer
that is worth $100,000.00. The more likely scenarios are students
graduating with Doctorates who spend six months to a year in a job
search and still cannot find a decent job at a reasonable salary, often
abandoning their chosen field to take *any* job. It's not just about a
degree and a chosen field. It's about how much corporate America is
willing to actually pay you. I think you need to go back and do a little
more research on the salary trends in the specific job markets you are
interested in. And take a look at if those fields are actually short on
qualified people to fill positions. There are many fields that cannot
fill open positions, but they aren't high end salaried jobs either.

Rick
s
2007-08-27 22:04:22 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology.
You're in luck. Those are all good fields. And you can combine
several of them. For example, computational biology is a great
field. And of course you can do patent law relating to biology
or computers.
Thanks, I did not know about such combinations from any of the folks I
talked to.
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
That's a good aim for a career, although that's not necessarily
the same thing as an aim in life (although that may not really
be what you meant).
Yes, that is what I wanted to state. It is aim for a career, not life,
though career is large part of a life.
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I strongly advise against making a career decision by putting so much
weight into how soon you can reach $100,000/yr. I advise against it
for two reasons. The first is that while it's perfectly possible to achieve, you may
find yourself stressed out and hating life, especially if you
sacrifice other things of value to get there. I'd much rather have
$80,000/yr and enjoy life than have $100,000/yr and hate it.
The second reason I advise against it is that even if your goal is
to make as much money as possible, for purely practical reasons you
should potentially avoid optimizing for making the most money early
in your career. You can't optimize for everything at once, and
24 or 25 is very early in your career. You need to be thinking
in terms of decades, not just a few years. The best career is the
one that has the best prospects over its entire course, not just
at the beginning. Even if all you cared about was money, you should
still be worrying about what has the most long-term growth potential,
because believe me, it would be fairly frustrating to hit $100,000
at age 25 and never be able to rise above that at age 45. There
are even some careers where advancement isn't easy *and* older people
tend to make less than younger people. In my opinion, that's something
you want to account for in your planning.
Indeed. Obviously, I don't want to choose a career solely for
pecuniary gains. I am well aware of folks who do that, cannot progress
in that(due to lack of true interest) and then change fields. Hence, I
outlined my interests and then the earning potential.
Post by Logan Shaw
Whatever you decide to do, good luck. You have a lot of time ahead of
you, and it sounds like you are motivated to do something worthwhile
with it.
Thanks for your advice, time and wishes. I may have some time, but not
as much as I would like. Most of my classmates have planned all
details by now.
Post by Logan Shaw
- Logan
Logan Shaw
2007-08-28 03:46:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology.
You're in luck. Those are all good fields. And you can combine
several of them. For example, computational biology is a great
field. And of course you can do patent law relating to biology
or computers.
Thanks, I did not know about such combinations from any of the folks I
talked to.
I only know about them because it just so happens that I got my degree
in computer science and my sister got her degrees (plural -- if I may
brag a moment, she just finished a Ph.D.!) in biology.

I don't know a ton about it, but one area is bioinformatics, which
involves putting DNA sequences or something related into the computer
and then some sort oing processing on them, like looking for repeated
patterns in one sequence, comparing sequences to each other to see
how different organisms relate, and so on. There are also a lot of
other sub-areas of computational biology, like modeling proteins.
Basically, biology, particularly genetics, is so complex that there
is a ton of information involved and it just makes more sense to do
certain things on the computer, and some things aren't practical for
a human to do at all and pretty much have to be done on a computer.

Regarding law and biology (or really, law and science in general),
obviously you can pursue a law degree, become attorney, and practice
patent law. But I believe you can pursue a scientific education
(usually a Ph.D., I would think) and then become a registered patent
agent, so that you are focused more on the technical end of the patent
process than the legal end. Presumably you work with a patent attorney.
You can presumably do the same thing with many scientific or even
some engineering degrees, and that would include computer science
(although I think software patents are mostly a bad thing, but that's
another subject).

By the way, as far as I can tell, getting a Ph.D. in computer science
is probably a lot easier than getting one in biology. Not because
computer science is a super-easy field, but because biology is super
competitive with multiple people vying for every position at every
stage of the game. On the other hand, biology usually requires less
math and you meet more women. ;-)

- Logan
s
2007-08-28 23:48:13 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology.
You're in luck. Those are all good fields. And you can combine
several of them. For example, computational biology is a great
field. And of course you can do patent law relating to biology
or computers.
Thanks, I did not know about such combinations from any of the folks I
talked to.
I only know about them because it just so happens that I got my degree
in computer science and my sister got her degrees (plural -- if I may
brag a moment, she just finished a Ph.D.!) in biology.
Yes, but it aided me and lots of others who will be viewing this
thread at some time.
Post by Logan Shaw
I don't know a ton about it, but one area is bioinformatics, which
involves putting DNA sequences or something related into the computer
and then some sort oing processing on them, like looking for repeated
patterns in one sequence, comparing sequences to each other to see
how different organisms relate, and so on. There are also a lot of
other sub-areas of computational biology, like modeling proteins.
Basically, biology, particularly genetics, is so complex that there
is a ton of information involved and it just makes more sense to do
certain things on the computer, and some things aren't practical for
a human to do at all and pretty much have to be done on a computer.
Regarding law and biology (or really, law and science in general),
obviously you can pursue a law degree, become attorney, and practice
patent law. But I believe you can pursue a scientific education
(usually a Ph.D., I would think) and then become a registered patent
agent, so that you are focused more on the technical end of the patent
process than the legal end. Presumably you work with a patent attorney.
You can presumably do the same thing with many scientific or even
some engineering degrees, and that would include computer science
(although I think software patents are mostly a bad thing, but that's
another subject).
By the way, as far as I can tell, getting a Ph.D. in computer science
is probably a lot easier than getting one in biology. Not because
computer science is a super-easy field, but because biology is super
competitive with multiple people vying for every position at every
stage of the game. On the other hand, biology usually requires less
math and you meet more women. ;-)
Thanks again for your useful suggestions. They are indeed valuable.
s
2007-08-27 23:10:44 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by Logan Shaw
You're in luck. Those are all good fields. And you can combine
several of them. For example, computational biology is a great
field. And of course you can do patent law relating to biology
or computers.
Post by s
I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
That's a good aim for a career, although that's not necessarily
the same thing as an aim in life (although that may not really
be what you meant).
Post by s
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I strongly advise against making a career decision by putting so much
weight into how soon you can reach $100,000/yr. I advise against it
for two reasons.
The first is that while it's perfectly possible to achieve, you may
find yourself stressed out and hating life, especially if you
sacrifice other things of value to get there. I'd much rather have
$80,000/yr and enjoy life than have $100,000/yr and hate it.
The second reason I advise against it is that even if your goal is
to make as much money as possible, for purely practical reasons you
should potentially avoid optimizing for making the most money early
in your career. You can't optimize for everything at once, and
24 or 25 is very early in your career. You need to be thinking
in terms of decades, not just a few years. The best career is the
one that has the best prospects over its entire course, not just
at the beginning. Even if all you cared about was money, you should
still be worrying about what has the most long-term growth potential,
because believe me, it would be fairly frustrating to hit $100,000
at age 25 and never be able to rise above that at age 45. There
are even some careers where advancement isn't easy *and* older people
tend to make less than younger people. In my opinion, that's something
you want to account for in your planning.
Whatever you decide to do, good luck. You have a lot of time ahead of
you, and it sounds like you are motivated to do something worthwhile
with it.
Thanks for your wishes, advice and time. They are truly useful.
Somehow my first reply did not come through, please excuse me if this
is a repost.
Post by Logan Shaw
- Logan
Chris Hill
2007-08-27 14:12:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor earning 100K or
atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure track position by
publishing sufficiently in Ph.D. The advantages are job security as I
plan to go for State universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in
a area where cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be
adopted if I go for a B.S. in Management, then Ph.D in the same field.
Or, just a B.S. in Management, working for three years for a reputed
company, then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can make me
eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a good college
can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about 19
which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could start
at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.
Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a
real estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one to
reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows proper
people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure mark in
middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting one's business
looks dicy.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager for
a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified nurses
anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local govt.
clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties. Some are
valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less at
31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.) Some
reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and some
experience at 26.
I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six figure mark in U.S.
according to general reports, but considering that only 30% of the
population have a B.S. or above, it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our
country who have a degree earn in six figures and average household
income seems about 200K in an area like Binghamton for a family in
twenties having both members of family working, excluding other part
time jobs people do(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites
etc.)
but looking at the thread it seems people without a degree can also
make it. Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating
the average salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than
salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any
advice.
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in
today's age with a proper
degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I am
indeed interested in those fields.
IT isn't how much you make, it is how much you get to keep. High
paying fields often require large amounts of debt to get started. It
only takes one good disabling injury to make such debt unpayable.
Only go into such a field if you really love it. Also be aware that
the competition in college will likely be different than it was in
high school. I understood calculus in high school; numerical analysis
in college computer science was quite difficult for me, but some
people in the class understood it like it was a printed grocery list.
Be sure you are as smart as you think you are before you commit to a
major.
Rod Speed
2007-08-27 19:14:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Hill
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living
is moderate?
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor earning 100K or
atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure track position by
publishing sufficiently in Ph.D. The advantages are job security as I
plan to go for State universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in
a area where cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be
adopted if I go for a B.S. in Management, then Ph.D in the same
field. Or, just a B.S. in Management, working for three years for a
reputed company, then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses
can make me eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a good college
can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about 19
which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could start
at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area
like Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S
at same campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the
certificate. The advantage is in this field stress seems to be
less(40-50hrs/week) as compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which
start with a six figure salary.
Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a
real estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one
to reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows
proper people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure
mark in middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting
one's business looks dicy.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager
for a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified nurses
anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local govt.
clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties. Some are
valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less at
31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.)
Some reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and some
experience at 26.
I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six figure mark in U.S.
according to general reports, but considering that only 30% of the
population have a B.S. or above, it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our
country who have a degree earn in six figures and average household
income seems about 200K in an area like Binghamton for a family in
twenties having both members of family working, excluding other part
time jobs people do(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites
etc.)
but looking at the thread it seems people without a degree can also
make it. Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating
the average salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than
salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any
advice.
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in
today's age with a proper
degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I am
indeed interested in those fields.
IT isn't how much you make, it is how much you get to keep. High
paying fields often require large amounts of debt to get started. It
only takes one good disabling injury to make such debt unpayable.
There arent that many that end up in that situation
tho, and you can insure against that unlikely possibility.
Post by Chris Hill
Only go into such a field if you really love it. Also be aware that
the competition in college will likely be different than it was in
high school. I understood calculus in high school; numerical analysis
in college computer science was quite difficult for me, but some
people in the class understood it like it was a printed grocery list.
Be sure you are as smart as you think you are before you commit to a major.
rick++
2007-08-27 14:48:06 UTC
Permalink
Its hard to predict 4 or 6 years out.
Many professions are cyclic. Business was in the toilet
after the dot.com and Enron disasters, but booming now.
Another example is medicine which is booming now. But
should a change in the US governement bring it under
stricter governement control and funding, it may not be as
lucrative.

My advice is choose something you love. Then try to be
int he top quarter or tenth of the field. Then you'll probably
always have job because very few fields have 90% unemployment.
Doing something you love helps get throught the economically slow
times.
s
2007-08-27 22:22:27 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by rick++
Its hard to predict 4 or 6 years out.
Many professions are cyclic. Business was in the toilet
after the dot.com and Enron disasters, but booming now.
Another example is medicine which is booming now. But
should a change in the US governement bring it under
stricter governement control and funding, it may not be as
lucrative.
Agreed, I was seeking a estimate. We all know few things are certain
in today's world.
Post by rick++
My advice is choose something you love. Then try to be
int he top quarter or tenth of the field. Then you'll probably
always have job because very few fields have 90% unemployment.
Doing something you love helps get throught the economically slow
times.
Yes, I want to choose a field which I am actually passionate about.
Regarding being in the top quarter or tenth of a field seems dicy as
regardless of what I do, there could be people better than me(global
and local competition). I missed a rank at class, though I was quite
certain as some other fellow did better than me in an exam. I was at
the top 1%, but after the final fell out of that.

Thanks for your advice and time.
Ron Peterson
2007-08-27 14:58:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
My nephew took an aptitude test to make is career decision after an
unproductive stint in the navy when he discovered he didn't want to
live in a submarine. He decided to become an actuary to take advantage
of his mathematical skills, but has put that on hold where he manages
a statistical analysis team at an HMO.

You aren't going to know what career you want and can qualify for
until you get your undergraduate degree. And even then you might want
to go into the building trades. There is a big plus in having a
licensed trade such as MD, nursing, plumbing, lawyer, etc. because of
the ability to select the community you want to live in.

Look at being a pharmacist because the pay is high, and working hours
are normal. It also gives you a way to progress to an academic career.

--
Ron
s
2007-08-27 22:26:51 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by Ron Peterson
My nephew took an aptitude test to make is career decision after an
unproductive stint in the navy when he discovered he didn't want to
live in a submarine. He decided to become an actuary to take advantage
of his mathematical skills, but has put that on hold where he manages
a statistical analysis team at an HMO.
You aren't going to know what career you want and can qualify for
until you get your undergraduate degree.
Maybe, but by the time I have got my B.S I have lost 3 years which is
a significant amount at any age(even assuming I get full scholarships
and living expenses are paid by some grant). Hence, the advice in high
school to be as clear as possible from the start. I fully appreciate
what you are stating that people change majors/careers, but also take
a impact due to it.

And even then you might want
Post by Ron Peterson
to go into the building trades. There is a big plus in having a
licensed trade such as MD, nursing, plumbing, lawyer, etc. because of
the ability to select the community you want to live in.
Can you please clarify what you intended by building trades and how
plumbing is included in that?
Post by Ron Peterson
Look at being a pharmacist because the pay is high, and working hours
are normal. It also gives you a way to progress to an academic career.
Yes, though a certified nurse anesthetist looks similar.

Thanks for your advice and time.
James
2007-08-27 18:29:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor earning 100K or
atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure track position by
publishing sufficiently in Ph.D. The advantages are job security as I
plan to go for State universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in
a area where cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be
adopted if I go for a B.S. in Management, then Ph.D in the same field.
Or, just a B.S. in Management, working for three years for a reputed
company, then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can make me
eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a good college
can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about 19
which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could start
at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.
Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a
real estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one to
reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows proper
people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure mark in
middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting one's business
looks dicy.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager for
a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified nurses
anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local govt.
clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties. Some are
valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less at
31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.) Some
reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and some
experience at 26.
I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six figure mark in U.S.
according to general reports, but considering that only 30% of the
population have a B.S. or above, it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our
country who have a degree earn in six figures and average household
income seems about 200K in an area like Binghamton for a family in
twenties having both members of family working, excluding other part
time jobs people do(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites
etc.)
but looking at the thread it seems people without a degree can also
make it. Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating
the average salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than
salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any
advice.
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in
today's age with a proper
degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I am
indeed interested in those fields.
I hope I am not considered a mercenary. I was just trying to weigh my
options, to ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.
Thanks a lot.
Eliminate all thoughts of the salary you want to make by the time you
are X.

Thats a road to unhappiness.

If you want to be wealthy, learn how to manage your money.

And find out which profession will challenge you, excite you. Which
profession will make you happy to come to work.

Thats the profession at which you will excel, and if you excel, you
will make good money.

If you pick a profession you end up hating, you will spend a lot of
time and money in a lost cause, and then have to start over. Thats the
worst outcome.

Want to stay out of debt? Look at schools close by. Consider
universities with co-op programs that alternate work and study
sessions. Get a part time job while you go to school. Take a few years
off to work before your first year.

There are very few programs where you can go to school for 3 year,
then make $100,000 right off the bat. But you can work after your
first degree, pay down your debt before your next degree. And if you
get the right employer, you can take a part time Masters degree and
get your employer to pay for it (mine does).

James
Ward Abbott
2007-08-27 19:56:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Go to a college and get all your basics behind you. You are JUST a
child and soliciting total strangers on how to plan your life doesn't
begin to make sense.

You should be talking with your parents, clergy, high school
counselors and trusted adults, not opinionated self appointed usenet
buffoons.
PaPaPeng
2007-08-27 21:52:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ward Abbott
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Go to a college and get all your basics behind you. You are JUST a
child and soliciting total strangers on how to plan your life doesn't
begin to make sense.
You should be talking with your parents, clergy, high school
counselors and trusted adults, not opinionated self appointed usenet
buffoons.
I hate to say this. The OP comes across as someone who wants to brag
to the whole world how clever and accomplished he is. A group of
total stragers whose common interest is frugality is hardly the place
to seek advice on academic options on how to make a six figure income
the fast track way.
s
2007-08-27 22:47:30 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by PaPaPeng
I hate to say this. The OP comes across as someone who wants to brag
to the whole world how clever and accomplished he is.
What would I gain by bragging(assuming I have something to boast
about). I don't see anything I have to be proud of and I certainly did
not intend to trumpet. Where did I state I am clever or talented? I
don't know about you, but 90% of folks at my age in my school are in
the same situation and we are encouraged to seek advice from as many
folks as possible.

I regret you misunderstood me.
Post by PaPaPeng
A group of
total stragers whose common interest is frugality is hardly the place
to seek advice on academic options on how to make a six figure income
the fast track way.
Agreed, they are group of total strangers, but folks whose common
interest is frugality have given me proper pointers on how to survive
college debt, general life advice and how to be frugal in life which
is quite important for anyone to start a college(or for that matter
most folks).
PaPaPeng
2007-08-28 02:24:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks for your reply.
Post by PaPaPeng
I hate to say this. The OP comes across as someone who wants to brag
to the whole world how clever and accomplished he is.
What would I gain by bragging(assuming I have something to boast
about). I don't see anything I have to be proud of and I certainly did
not intend to trumpet. Where did I state I am clever or talented? I
don't know about you, but 90% of folks at my age in my school are in
the same situation and we are encouraged to seek advice from as many
folks as possible.
I regret you misunderstood me.
I apologise. I believe someone else had already advised that a "hot"
degree now may no longer be hot by the time you graduate. So chose an
area you have an interest in that will earn you a decent income on
graduation. I think the current range for entry level salaries is 40k
to 60k. For an undergraduate degree do a professional degree where
you can always hang up a shingle and work for yourself. This gives a
very high comfort level for whatever academic or professional pursuit
you may wish to pursue thereafter. Its a fallback position in case
your enthusiasm for intense academic work falters and you have only a
bachelor's degree. A three of four year non professional degree goes
nowhere if you don't go the PhD route.

For a graduate degree chose something entirely different from your
undergrad degree. This widens your attractiveness to a employer.
Same for a post grad degree. Make a good choice for your undergrad
degree first. Once in the university you will come across many highly
qualified and highly experienced people who can give you much better
advice than any newsgroup can. A newsgroup is perhaps useful for
finding out if there are any real world downsides once you have made a
choice for action. But we are not good at advising you on specifics
to get on the road to success.
Post by s
Post by PaPaPeng
A group of
total stragers whose common interest is frugality is hardly the place
to seek advice on academic options on how to make a six figure income
the fast track way.
Agreed, they are group of total strangers, but folks whose common
interest is frugality have given me proper pointers on how to survive
college debt, general life advice and how to be frugal in life which
is quite important for anyone to start a college(or for that matter
most folks).
s
2007-08-28 23:46:21 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by PaPaPeng
Post by s
I regret you misunderstood me.
I apologise.
That is fine. We all make errors.
Post by PaPaPeng
I believe someone else had already advised that a "hot"
degree now may no longer be hot by the time you graduate. So chose an
area you have an interest in that will earn you a decent income on
graduation. I think the current range for entry level salaries is 40k
to 60k. For an undergraduate degree do a professional degree where
you can always hang up a shingle and work for yourself. This gives a
very high comfort level for whatever academic or professional pursuit
you may wish to pursue thereafter. Its a fallback position in case
your enthusiasm for intense academic work falters and you have only a
bachelor's degree. A three of four year non professional degree goes
nowhere if you don't go the PhD route.
I will keep this in mind.
Post by PaPaPeng
For a graduate degree chose something entirely different from your
undergrad degree. This widens your attractiveness to a employer.
Same for a post grad degree. Make a good choice for your undergrad
degree first. Once in the university you will come across many highly
qualified and highly experienced people who can give you much better
advice than any newsgroup can. A newsgroup is perhaps useful for
finding out if there are any real world downsides once you have made a
choice for action. But we are not good at advising you on specifics
to get on the road to success.
Not quite, folks in newsgroups like you have mentioned me lot more
than I have learnt from people at high school,
colleges, trusted adults. IMHO, the more people you communicate with
the more your knowledge expands. This group
has mentioned combinations I did not know(computational biology),
actual downsides of any market, how bureacracy
is present etc. In other words, people in newsgroups are not limited
in what they can state, so most of them
give unbiased advice. College officials, high schools are(as someone
pointed out). Remeber, not only have I learnt a lot
but anyone searching the web for choice of major at any point will
benefit by this thread and your valuable advice.
Thanks again for your advice and time.
s
2007-08-27 22:41:57 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the reply.
Post by Ward Abbott
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Go to a college and get all your basics behind you. You are JUST a
child
Perhaps, I am not an adult yet, but a child at 16 seems odd to me?
Post by Ward Abbott
and soliciting total strangers on how to plan your life doesn't
begin to make sense.
Is seeking advice improper at any age? Total strangers are from
different parts of world/country who don't to stand to gain anything
by giving me proper advice. Hence, I sought their advice.
Post by Ward Abbott
You should be talking with your parents, clergy, high school
counselors and trusted adults, not opinionated self appointed usenet
buffoons.
As I stated I spoke with folks in my area, high school advisors, but
thought few more opinions would only help. Trusted adults(I don't have
many) want me to mind their lawn business, work at their grocery
store, errand boy for them so that they don't have to hire someone.
Don't intend to disparage anyone, but even if I had proper folks to
guide me, I would only benefit from suggestions as I am doing by the
wise advice given to me, by all who replied to me. Little things about
life, finance, relations etc. are useful indeed. They are not
buffoons,IMHO, if they are attempting to aid someone as an volunteer.

Thanks for your advice and time.
Logan Shaw
2007-08-28 04:29:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks for the reply.
Post by Ward Abbott
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Go to a college and get all your basics behind you. You are JUST a
child
Perhaps, I am not an adult yet, but a child at 16 seems odd to me?
It's all a matter of perspective. When I was 16, I was always
seriously annoyed when people referred to me as a child. I just
hit 36 a few months ago, and now to me 16 seems really young. I
think people think this way mainly because they think back on when
*they* were 16, and it seems like a really long time ago, and then
they think of all the stupid things they did back then, and that
makes it seem really young. :-)
Post by s
As I stated I spoke with folks in my area, high school advisors, but
thought few more opinions would only help. Trusted adults(I don't have
many) want me to mind their lawn business, work at their grocery
store, errand boy for them so that they don't have to hire someone.
It's tricky to know whose advice to trust. A lot of people have
preconceived notions about how things should work and about who is
going to end up doing what. My mom's guidance counselor in high
school set her up on the academic track that was required to be a
homemaker because that's what was expected back then. I at one point
in college (after I had screwed around a *lot* and racked up quite
an array of bad grades) had an advisor tell me college is not for
everyone and I should quit trying. Then I've also gotten some good
advice from a number of people as well.

So, it's important to take in a lot of information, but no matter
what, you ultimately have to weigh it for yourself, and using the
best judgment you possibly can apply, make the decision for yourself
and not let anyone tell you what to do.

- Logan
s
2007-08-28 23:49:29 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the reply.
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
Post by Ward Abbott
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Go to a college and get all your basics behind you. You are JUST a
child
Perhaps, I am not an adult yet, but a child at 16 seems odd to me?
It's all a matter of perspective. When I was 16, I was always
seriously annoyed when people referred to me as a child. I just
hit 36 a few months ago, and now to me 16 seems really young. I
think people think this way mainly because they think back on when
*they* were 16, and it seems like a really long time ago, and then
they think of all the stupid things they did back then, and that
makes it seem really young. :-)
Post by s
As I stated I spoke with folks in my area, high school advisors, but
thought few more opinions would only help. Trusted adults(I don't have
many) want me to mind their lawn business, work at their grocery
store, errand boy for them so that they don't have to hire someone.
It's tricky to know whose advice to trust. A lot of people have
preconceived notions about how things should work and about who is
going to end up doing what. My mom's guidance counselor in high
school set her up on the academic track that was required to be a
homemaker because that's what was expected back then. I at one point
in college (after I had screwed around a *lot* and racked up quite
an array of bad grades) had an advisor tell me college is not for
everyone and I should quit trying. Then I've also gotten some good
advice from a number of people as well.
So, it's important to take in a lot of information, but no matter
what, you ultimately have to weigh it for yourself, and using the
best judgment you possibly can apply, make the decision for yourself
and not let anyone tell you what to do.
Truly, that is the reason I posted, to get unbiased opinions from
folks who have experienced life lot more than me.

Thanks again.
s
2007-08-27 23:14:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ward Abbott
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Go to a college and get all your basics behind you. You are JUST a
child and soliciting total strangers on how to plan your life doesn't
begin to make sense.
You should be talking with your parents, clergy, high school
counselors and trusted adults, not opinionated self appointed usenet
buffoons.
Thanks for your reply. Usenet people are not bufoons, but actual
people trying to aid someone for gratis which is commendable, IMHO. I
talked to folks in my high school and some actual people, but more
opinions from many people(who can be found on Usenet) is more useful.
s
2007-08-27 22:34:49 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the reply.
Post by James
Eliminate all thoughts of the salary you want to make by the time you
are X.
Thats a road to unhappiness.
If you want to be wealthy, learn how to manage your money.
Yes, but you need to have something saved to manage which people who
live from paycheck to paycheck find it difficult to do.
Post by James
And find out which profession will challenge you, excite you. Which
profession will make you happy to come to work.
Amen. I want to choose a career which will interest me a lot.
Post by James
Thats the profession at which you will excel, and if you excel, you
will make good money.
Well said. That is why I realize you need to choose a career which
needs to motivate you.
Post by James
If you pick a profession you end up hating, you will spend a lot of
time and money in a lost cause, and then have to start over. Thats the
worst outcome.
Agreed.
Post by James
Want to stay out of debt? Look at schools close by. Consider
universities with co-op programs that alternate work and study
sessions. Get a part time job while you go to school. Take a few years
off to work before your first year.
Well, to get out of debt I was told to try for as many grants/
scholarships through Federal, state, local govt. etc, in addition to
the ones offered at a college.
Post by James
There are very few programs where you can go to school for 3 year,
then make $100,000 right off the bat.
None, I know of in just three years of college. The ones I was
describing need atleast 6-7 years of college(which is fairly reputed).
Post by James
But you can work after your
first degree, pay down your debt before your next degree. And if you
get the right employer, you can take a part time Masters degree and
get your employer to pay for it (mine does).
Yes, certain places like Envision credit union offer a reimbursement
policy where if you work for them full time, they reimburse you for
1-2 classes per semester. But, that would take a long time to take a
degree. Easier seems to get scholarships(obviously, if I manage to get
one)

Thanks for your reply and time.
s
2007-08-27 23:12:25 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by James
Thats the profession at which you will excel, and if you excel, you
will make good money.
If you pick a profession you end up hating, you will spend a lot of
time and money in a lost cause, and then have to start over. Thats the
worst outcome.
Yes, I will keep that in mind.
Post by James
Want to stay out of debt? Look at schools close by. Consider
universities with co-op programs that alternate work and study
sessions. Get a part time job while you go to school. Take a few years
off to work before your first year.
Thanks for your advice and time.
Post by James
There are very few programs where you can go to school for 3 year,
then make $100,000 right off the bat. But you can work after your
first degree, pay down your debt before your next degree. And if you
get the right employer, you can take a part time Masters degree and
get your employer to pay for it (mine does).
James- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Don K
2007-08-27 22:18:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
Look up the median and spread of salaries in those fields vs. experience,
then realistically evaluate where your skills and drive would rank you
against the competition.

You can expect to match or exceed the median salary only if you can produce
better results than the average worker in that field, whether though ability
or hard work.

So one way to achieve your $$ goal is to be a genius who can easily do anything.
Or if you have more modest abilities, compensate by working 80 hour weeks.

More important than a specific targeted $$ salary is whether it will be
something you enjoy doing. Keep in mind that technology will probably
change several times over your career. What you learn in school will
not be exactly what you end up doing.

Don
s
2007-08-27 22:53:06 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply and time.
Post by Don K
Look up the median and spread of salaries in those fields vs. experience,
then realistically evaluate where your skills and drive would rank you
against the competition.
Yes, but gaining actual opinion from actual world people also helps,
rather than looking up statistics on the web.
Post by Don K
You can expect to match or exceed the median salary only if you can produce
better results than the average worker in that field, whether though ability
or hard work.
So one way to achieve your $$ goal is to be a genius who can easily do anything.
Well, folks in that category are fairly bright(lawyers, doctors,
faculties etc), not a genius IMHO.
Post by Don K
Or if you have more modest abilities, compensate by working 80 hour weeks.
This will not work when I turn 40. Doing two jobs one person earning
50K in each job can reach the 100K, but it typically seems difficult.
Post by Don K
More important than a specific targeted $$ salary is whether it will be
something you enjoy doing. Keep in mind that technology will probably
change several times over your career. What you learn in school will
not be exactly what you end up doing.
Unquestionably, I want to choose a field which I truly like and one
learns basics in college, which one needs to adapt to other
situations.

Thanks for your reply and time.
Rod Speed
2007-08-28 00:05:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks for your reply and time.
Post by Don K
Look up the median and spread of salaries in those fields vs.
experience,
then realistically evaluate where your skills and drive would rank you
against the competition.
Yes, but gaining actual opinion from actual world people also helps,
rather than looking up statistics on the web.
Post by Don K
You can expect to match or exceed the median salary only if you can
produce better results than the average worker in that field,
whether though ability
or hard work.
So one way to achieve your $$ goal is to be a genius who can easily do anything.
Well, folks in that category are fairly bright(lawyers, doctors,
faculties etc), not a genius IMHO.
Post by Don K
Or if you have more modest abilities, compensate by working 80 hour weeks.
This will not work when I turn 40.
It does for some.
Post by s
Doing two jobs one person earning 50K in each job
can reach the 100K, but it typically seems difficult.
It isnt necessarily two jobs, one of the local GPs operates like that,
literally works every single day of the week, very long hours every day.
Likely works more than 80 hour weeks and would certainly have a very
high income, and is older than that.
Post by s
Post by Don K
More important than a specific targeted $$ salary is whether it will
be something you enjoy doing. Keep in mind that technology will
probably
change several times over your career. What you learn in school will
not be exactly what you end up doing.
Unquestionably, I want to choose a field which I truly like and one
learns basics in college, which one needs to adapt to other situations.
I doubt most actually do need the basics in college, its more of a personality thing.

The main advantage of college is that its required for most
professional jobs, you wont even get a start without it.
Post by s
Thanks for your reply and time.
Logan Shaw
2007-08-28 04:59:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Post by Don K
Or if you have more modest abilities, compensate by working 80 hour weeks.
This will not work when I turn 40. Doing two jobs one person earning
50K in each job can reach the 100K, but it typically seems difficult.
I think he means working 80 hours/week at a job that is nominally 40
hours/week. Even if you have nothing else to offer to a company, the
ability to work hard is usually appreciated and sets you apart from
your co-workers, thus leading to a promotion (provided other things
fall into place as well) and thus more money.

- Logan
Rod Speed
2007-08-28 05:46:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
Post by Don K
Or if you have more modest abilities, compensate by working 80 hour weeks.
This will not work when I turn 40. Doing two jobs one person earning
50K in each job can reach the 100K, but it typically seems difficult.
I think he means working 80 hours/week at a job that is nominally 40
hours/week. Even if you have nothing else to offer to a company, the
ability to work hard is usually appreciated and sets you apart from
your co-workers, thus leading to a promotion (provided other things
fall into place as well) and thus more money.
And if you are working for yourself, those very long hours
may well have a significant effect on your income.

Thats certainly true of a local GP that works unbelievable hours.
s
2007-08-28 23:52:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
Post by Don K
Or if you have more modest abilities, compensate by working 80 hour weeks.
This will not work when I turn 40. Doing two jobs one person earning
50K in each job can reach the 100K, but it typically seems difficult.
I think he means working 80 hours/week at a job that is nominally 40
hours/week. Even if you have nothing else to offer to a company, the
ability to work hard is usually appreciated and sets you apart from
your co-workers, thus leading to a promotion (provided other things
fall into place as well) and thus more money.
I understand your point fully.

But, at 40-50 physically it is difficult to work 80hrs/week at the
same job, IMHO. That is what I wanted to state.
Thanks for clarifying.
Rod Speed
2007-08-29 00:44:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Post by Logan Shaw
Post by s
Post by Don K
Or if you have more modest abilities, compensate by working 80 hour weeks.
This will not work when I turn 40. Doing two jobs one person earning
50K in each job can reach the 100K, but it typically seems
difficult.
I think he means working 80 hours/week at a job that is nominally 40
hours/week. Even if you have nothing else to offer to a company, the
ability to work hard is usually appreciated and sets you apart from
your co-workers, thus leading to a promotion (provided other things
fall into place as well) and thus more money.
I understand your point fully.
But, at 40-50 physically it is difficult to work 80hrs/week at the same job, IMHO.
Its just not true, plenty do that. Particularly those who are fortunate
enough to be paid to do what they prefer to spend their time doing.
Post by s
That is what I wanted to state. Thanks for clarifying.
Dennis
2007-08-27 22:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Right. And just a couple weeks ago, you were an IT worker with a safe
but underpaid government job who was trying to advise two teenage
charges with high ambitions who were nearing graduation.

I wonder who will you be next week?

What an odd troll.

Dennis (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally
s
2007-08-27 23:00:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dennis
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Right. And just a couple weeks ago, you were an IT worker with a safe
but underpaid government job who was trying to advise two teenage
charges with high ambitions who were nearing graduation.
Do you realize computers/Internet connection can be shared?

They can ALSO be used by your neighbours/friend's(and you also can use
your neighbour's/friend's/colleague')?
Dennis
2007-08-27 23:24:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Post by Dennis
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Right. And just a couple weeks ago, you were an IT worker with a safe
but underpaid government job who was trying to advise two teenage
charges with high ambitions who were nearing graduation.
Do you realize computers/Internet connection can be shared?
They can ALSO be used by your neighbours/friend's(and you also can use
your neighbour's/friend's/colleague')?
Really? Do you also share your writing style, spelling quirks and
favorite phrases with your neighbors and friends?

Such a chummy group! LOL

Busted! I vote troll. (But a reasonably polite one. ;-)

Dennis (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally
George
2007-08-28 10:41:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dennis
Really? Do you also share your writing style, spelling quirks and
favorite phrases with your neighbors and friends?
Such a chummy group! LOL
Busted! I vote troll. (But a reasonably polite one. ;-)
Dennis (evil)
I also vote troll and wondered how the thread had lasted for so long.
h***@hotmail.com
2007-08-28 13:36:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dennis
Post by s
Post by Dennis
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Right. And just a couple weeks ago, you were an IT worker with a safe
but underpaid government job who was trying to advise two teenage
charges with high ambitions who were nearing graduation.
Do you realize computers/Internet connection can be shared?
They can ALSO be used by your neighbours/friend's(and you also can use
your neighbour's/friend's/colleague')?
Really? Do you also share your writing style, spelling quirks and
favorite phrases with your neighbors and friends?
Such a chummy group! LOL
Busted! I vote troll. (But a reasonably polite one. ;-)
Dennis (evil)
Shoulda known. However, the subject matter is something that could
help the few teen lurkers left. On a waste of time scale, this one
was much less than political rants.
Dennis
2007-08-28 16:25:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by Dennis
Post by s
Post by Dennis
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Right. And just a couple weeks ago, you were an IT worker with a safe
but underpaid government job who was trying to advise two teenage
charges with high ambitions who were nearing graduation.
Do you realize computers/Internet connection can be shared?
They can ALSO be used by your neighbours/friend's(and you also can use
your neighbour's/friend's/colleague')?
Really? Do you also share your writing style, spelling quirks and
favorite phrases with your neighbors and friends?
Such a chummy group! LOL
Busted! I vote troll. (But a reasonably polite one. ;-)
Dennis (evil)
Shoulda known. However, the subject matter is something that could
help the few teen lurkers left. On a waste of time scale, this one
was much less than political rants.
Yeah, this is a strange one. The poster has been consistently polite
and engaging. You gotta wonder why he bothered with the fictional
backstories. Maybe it's all research for a book/article/term project
or something.

But what I really wonder about is whether there is a trend towards
voluntary simplicity in the future.
:-)

Dennis (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally
m***@privacy.net
2007-08-28 16:32:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dennis
But what I really wonder about is whether there is a trend towards
voluntary simplicity in the future.
Possibly

Maybe it will be forced upon us by economic forces?
Rod Speed
2007-08-28 19:50:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@privacy.net
Post by Dennis
But what I really wonder about is whether there is
a trend towards voluntary simplicity in the future.
Possibly
Maybe it will be forced upon us by economic forces?
I doubt it.

That didnt even happen much during the great depression
and we have worked out how to avoid those now.

Didnt happen in Japan recently either.
Shawn Hirn
2007-08-28 00:07:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
The likelihood is, you can't. Speak to a guidance counselor at school
and ask about setting realistic goals in your life.
s
2007-08-28 23:35:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shawn Hirn
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
The likelihood is, you can't. Speak to a guidance counselor at school
and ask about setting realistic goals in your life.
Thanks for your reply. I already did that.
Lou
2007-08-28 00:37:39 UTC
Permalink
At 16, or even 17, I'd be surprised if you knew enough about the world to
make a lifetime choice. If you have a "calling" for some field, that's one
thing, but your interests seem fairly broad at the moment, so that doesn't
seem to be the case.

I haven't been to your neck of the woods in 20 years or more, but back then
there was a wonderful restaurant called Pierce's. It was in Elmira, which
as I recall is 50-60 miles from Binghamtom. I'd be surprised if the head
chef at that establishment made only $100k annually - the head chef at a
restaurant in my town of 30,000 makes $130,000/year and he's not yet 30.
Educational requirements are fairly minimal - a year and a half or so at a
good cooking school - followed by aptitude and experience.

OK, you're not interested in cooking. I merely point this out as an
example - there may be many more ways of achieving your financial goals than
you're presently aware of. Choosing a major based on future compensation is
basically a bet. Everyone who goes on to post-secondary education has to
make it, but there are no guarantees, and if there's a rational way to make
that bet, I've never heard of it.

Whatever major you choose, try to get an education (not just training) while
you're at school. And whatever you end up working at, try to leave the
world a little better off than you found it.

No new material below - included for reference only
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor earning 100K or
atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure track position by
publishing sufficiently in Ph.D. The advantages are job security as I
plan to go for State universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in
a area where cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be
adopted if I go for a B.S. in Management, then Ph.D in the same field.
Or, just a B.S. in Management, working for three years for a reputed
company, then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can make me
eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a good college
can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about 19
which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could start
at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.
Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a
real estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one to
reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows proper
people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure mark in
middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting one's business
looks dicy.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
Post by s
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager for
a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified nurses
anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local govt.
clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties. Some are
valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less at
31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.) Some
reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and some
experience at 26.
I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six figure mark in U.S.
according to general reports, but considering that only 30% of the
population have a B.S. or above, it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our
country who have a degree earn in six figures and average household
income seems about 200K in an area like Binghamton for a family in
twenties having both members of family working, excluding other part
time jobs people do(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites
etc.)
but looking at the thread it seems people without a degree can also
make it. Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating
the average salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than
salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any
advice.
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in
today's age with a proper
degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I am
indeed interested in those fields.
I hope I am not considered a mercenary. I was just trying to weigh my
options, to ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.
Thanks a lot.
s
2007-08-28 23:37:33 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by Lou
At 16, or even 17, I'd be surprised if you knew enough about the world to
make a lifetime choice. If you have a "calling" for some field, that's one
thing, but your interests seem fairly broad at the moment, so that doesn't
seem to be the case.
I haven't been to your neck of the woods in 20 years or more, but back then
there was a wonderful restaurant called Pierce's. It was in Elmira, which
as I recall is 50-60 miles from Binghamtom. I'd be surprised if the head
chef at that establishment made only $100k annually - the head chef at a
restaurant in my town of 30,000 makes $130,000/year and he's not yet 30.
Educational requirements are fairly minimal - a year and a half or so at a
good cooking school - followed by aptitude and experience.
OK, you're not interested in cooking. I merely point this out as an
example - there may be many more ways of achieving your financial goals than
you're presently aware of. Choosing a major based on future compensation is
basically a bet. Everyone who goes on to post-secondary education has to
make it, but there are no guarantees, and if there's a rational way to make
that bet, I've never heard of it.
Whatever major you choose, try to get an education (not just training) while
you're at school. And whatever you end up working at, try to leave the
world a little better off than you found it.
Amen. I will always remember that. This post has generated useful
suggestions most folks
can use(teenagers, people out of college)

Thanks a lot for your advice and time.
Post by Lou
No new material below - included for reference only
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor earning 100K or
atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure track position by
publishing sufficiently in Ph.D. The advantages are job security as I
plan to go for State universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in
a area where cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be
adopted if I go for a B.S. in Management, then Ph.D in the same field.
Or, just a B.S. in Management, working for three years for a reputed
company, then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can make me
eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a good college
can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about 19
which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could start
at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.
Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a
real estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one to
reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows proper
people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure mark in
middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting one's business
looks dicy.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
Post by s
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager for
a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified nurses
anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local govt.
clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties. Some are
valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less at
31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.) Some
reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and some
experience at 26.
I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six figure mark in U.S.
according to general reports, but considering that only 30% of the
population have a B.S. or above, it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our
country who have a degree earn in six figures and average household
income seems about 200K in an area like Binghamton for a family in
twenties having both members of family working, excluding other part
time jobs people do(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites
etc.)
but looking at the thread it seems people without a degree can also
make it. Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating
the average salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than
salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any
advice.
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in
today's age with a proper
degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I am
indeed interested in those fields.
I hope I am not considered a mercenary. I was just trying to weigh my
options, to ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.
Thanks a lot.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
val189
2007-08-28 01:54:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
My interests lie in computing, management, law and biology. I realize
the aim in life should be to do something about one which is truly
passionate and where monetary compensation is fairly high.
Can someone please advise how can I reach the 6 figure salary right
after college in areas like Binghamton, NY where the cost of living is
moderate?
I realize I can finish a B.S. in Computer Science in three years at
20, go for a Ph.D which can be done in another 4 years, then start
with a six figure salary as an Assistant Professor earning 100K or
atleast 95K at 24 if I manage to get a tenure track position by
publishing sufficiently in Ph.D. The advantages are job security as I
plan to go for State universities, high salary of 95-100K at 24-25 in
a area where cost of living is reasonable. The same method can be
adopted if I go for a B.S. in Management, then Ph.D in the same field.
Or, just a B.S. in Management, working for three years for a reputed
company, then a Management degree from the top 10 campuses can make me
eligible for the 100K range at 25.
Getting a general B.S. degree, then a law degree from a good college
can lead me to 100K mark after finishing college.
Some have advised me, I could take the pre-req classes for medicine,
take the MCAT, go to medical college for a surgeon degree at about 19
which hopefully can be done by the time I am 26. Then, I could start
at 100-125K in areas like Binghamton working for a hospital.
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.
Clearly, starting one's own business, entering politics, starting a
real estate business etc. are far more lucrative and can enable one to
reach a 7 figure income before he turns 30 assuming he knows proper
people and works correctly, but I want to reach the 6 figure mark in
middle twenties in a relatively stable way and starting one's business
looks dicy.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-...
seems to suggest lot of folks achieve the six figure mark and some
don't have a college degree, work as a truck driver, store manager for
a store like Walmart, Home Depot etc. Others are certified nurses
anesthetists, cops, etc. working for State/Fedetal/local govt.
clearing six figures at twenties or in the early thirties. Some are
valet managers and folks seem to suggest 150K is too less at
31(though, it is debatable and depends on person's location etc.) Some
reached the six figure mark with a High School diploma and some
experience at 26.
I am aware that only 10% of folks reach the six figure mark in U.S.
according to general reports, but considering that only 30% of the
population have a B.S. or above, it seems 1/3rd of the folks in our
country who have a degree earn in six figures and average household
income seems about 200K in an area like Binghamton for a family in
twenties having both members of family working, excluding other part
time jobs people do(blogging, selling items on ebay, creating sites
etc.)
but looking at the thread it seems people without a degree can also
make it. Obviously, people having their own businesses have 7 figure
revenues if it pans out well, which are not considered in calculating
the average salary, as it is a business revenue, rather than
salary(sort of fixed income).
As this group has lot of folks who are experienced about many aspects
of life, how to be frugal in life I would sincerely appreciate any
advice.
I have talked to my high school advisor and was advised most folks in
today's age with a proper
degree(medicine,law,nursing,sciences,IT,pharmacy etc.) reach the six
figure mark before they turn 30 and I should aim for that if I am
indeed interested in those fields.
I hope I am not considered a mercenary. I was just trying to weigh my
options, to ensure I don't get into debt at a low salary.
Thanks a lot.
Tell us who's going to pay for all this schooling. Do you plan to
start your work life debt free? Why the need to start at the six
figure level?

I can't predict, in your case, but I can tell you that many pick a
major and, as they mature, realize it was totally the wrong field for
them. Unfortunately, some of them stay in the field, hating it but
being sucked in by the rising income, plus the fear of making a change
sets in to boot. Resolve not to do that and you'll be a happier
person.
s
2007-08-28 23:41:34 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your reply.
Post by val189
Tell us who's going to pay for all this schooling.
Hoping on scholarships/grants for tuition and for living expenses part
time jobs/summer internships(if I manage to get)
or some loans. Atleast that is the plan for undergrad. Grad college
most people state similarly, you can get grants/scholarships etc.
Post by val189
Do you plan to
start your work life debt free? Why the need to start at the six
figure level?
Hope to start it debt free(though I realize it is wishful thinking at
present). Need is severe financial hardships faced till now.
Post by val189
I can't predict, in your case, but I can tell you that many pick a
major and, as they mature, realize it was totally the wrong field for
them. Unfortunately, some of them stay in the field, hating it but
being sucked in by the rising income, plus the fear of making a change
sets in to boot. Resolve not to do that and you'll be a happier
person.- Hide quoted text -
Thanks for your advice and time.
cat
2007-08-28 17:48:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.
I realize you're already been outed as a troll, but for anyone who is
actually serious about nursing:

You can't come out of high school and get a BS/MS in nursing in three years.
Most generic students who go for the BSN alone are lucky to finish in four,
what with all the prerequisites. The BS/MS option is for nurses who have
already completed diplomas or associate's degrees in nursing and have
several years of nursing experience, or for generic students who already
have baccalaureate degrees. You also can't come out of nursing school and
go right into anesthesia school. CRNA programs are master's-level, BTW, not
certificates, and they all require experience in emergency room or intensive
care nursing prior to application. Admissions are highly competitive, and
students are strongly discouraged from working while they go to school due
to the intensity of the programs, so even with the stipend that some
programs offer, financial stability is crucial.

And anyone who thinks nursing is a low-stress job is truly either a troll or
a complete moron.
s
2007-08-29 00:07:25 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the reply.
Post by cat
Post by s
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified nursing
anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in an area like
Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish B.S.+ M.S at same
campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain the certificate. The
advantage is in this field stress seems to be less(40-50hrs/week) as
compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week) which start with a six figure
salary.
You can't come out of high school and get a BS/MS in nursing in three years.
If someone turns 17 in May 08, starts college in Aug 08, at 22 he will
have spent 5 years in college, NOT three. I never stated I could get
B.S.+M.S in three, but FIVE. And yes, I have seen dozens of average
folks do that and several college
advisors told me their college allows that.
Post by cat
Most generic students who go for the BSN alone are lucky to finish in four,
what with all the prerequisites.
Really? I know folks who after their B.S. in a field like psychology,
get a B.S. in Nursing in one year(fast track program which involves
taking summer/winter classes which are truly hectic, but possible).
Post by cat
The BS/MS option is for nurses who have
already completed diplomas or associate's degrees in nursing and have
several years of nursing experience, or for generic students who already
have baccalaureate degrees.
Not all colleges. If you are getting a B.S in Nursing in some
campus(just from high school), you probably can get a M.S also in same
field in the same campus after you complete B.S.
Post by cat
You also can't come out of nursing school and
go right into anesthesia school. CRNA programs are master's-level, BTW, not
certificates, and they all require experience in emergency room or intensive
care nursing prior to application.
I mentioned 2 years of work is required and that is what I intended by
work(though I did not clarify it)
Post by cat
Admissions are highly competitive, and
students are strongly discouraged from working while they go to school due
to the intensity of the programs, so even with the stipend that some
programs offer, financial stability is crucial.
World is competitive and these fields are no different. Most M.S
students seem to work during their M.S. as a Teaching Assistant/
Reaearch Assistant though their field is also competitive.
Post by cat
And anyone who thinks nursing is a low-stress job is truly either a troll or
a complete moron.
No job is stress free. Low stress is relative. I was referring their
job is 60-70 not 80-90 as investment bankers/surgeons, though it
depends on your employer a lot. Your advice might be useful for
someone who might have no idea about nursing.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
mentions someone
who who mentions that degree is useful in terms of cost/benefit. That
is what I was partly referring to. I regret you misunderstood me. But,
anyway thanks for your time.
Rod Speed
2007-08-29 00:49:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Thanks for the reply.
Post by cat
Post by s
Going for a Nursing degree(B.S.+M.S), then become a certified
nursing anesthetistic could enable me to start with 125K or so in
an area like Binghamton at the age of 25, if we consider I finish
B.S.+ M.S at same campus by 22, work for two years and then obtain
the certificate. The advantage is in this field stress seems to be
less(40-50hrs/week) as compared to other fields(70-80hrs/week)
which start with a six figure salary.
You can't come out of high school and get a BS/MS in nursing in three years.
If someone turns 17 in May 08, starts college in Aug 08, at 22 he will
have spent 5 years in college, NOT three. I never stated I could get
B.S.+M.S in three, but FIVE. And yes, I have seen dozens of average
folks do that and several college
advisors told me their college allows that.
Post by cat
Most generic students who go for the BSN alone are lucky to finish
in four, what with all the prerequisites.
Really? I know folks who after their B.S. in a field like psychology,
get a B.S. in Nursing in one year(fast track program which involves
taking summer/winter classes which are truly hectic, but possible).
Post by cat
The BS/MS option is for nurses who have
already completed diplomas or associate's degrees in nursing and have
several years of nursing experience, or for generic students who
already have baccalaureate degrees.
Not all colleges. If you are getting a B.S in Nursing in some
campus(just from high school), you probably can get a M.S also in same
field in the same campus after you complete B.S.
Post by cat
You also can't come out of nursing school and
go right into anesthesia school. CRNA programs are master's-level,
BTW, not certificates, and they all require experience in emergency
room or intensive care nursing prior to application.
I mentioned 2 years of work is required and that is what I intended by
work(though I did not clarify it)
Post by cat
Admissions are highly competitive, and
students are strongly discouraged from working while they go to
school due to the intensity of the programs, so even with the
stipend that some programs offer, financial stability is crucial.
World is competitive and these fields are no different. Most M.S
students seem to work during their M.S. as a Teaching Assistant/
Reaearch Assistant though their field is also competitive.
Yeah, thats what I did, and it was a research degree too.
Post by s
Post by cat
And anyone who thinks nursing is a low-stress job is truly either a
troll or a complete moron.
No job is stress free.
Some are, particularly when you are paid to do what you
prefer to spend your time doing and you work for yourself
and can be selective about what you get involved in.
Post by s
Low stress is relative. I was referring their job is 60-70 not
80-90 as investment bankers/surgeons, though it depends
on your employer a lot. Your advice might be useful for
someone who might have no idea about nursing.
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
mentions someone who who mentions that degree is useful
in terms of cost/benefit. That is what I was partly referring to.
I regret you misunderstood me. But, anyway thanks for your time.
rick++
2007-08-29 13:39:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rod Speed
Yeah, thats what I did, and it was a research degree too.
Australia wasnt it? The UK-derived school systems often allow what US
calls professional studies as the first degree. I was reading about
an
American who go a law degree at Oxford in three years,
which would have taken twice as long and fives times tuition in the US.
James
2007-08-29 19:48:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by rick++
Post by Rod Speed
Yeah, thats what I did, and it was a research degree too.
Australia wasnt it? The UK-derived school systems often allow what US
calls professional studies as the first degree. I was reading about
an
American who go a law degree at Oxford in three years,
which would have taken twice as long and fives times tuition in the US.
Well not quite.

In the US and Canada, you have to have a Bachelor's degree to apply to
Law school, which is then a three year course.

In the UK, you can get a Bachelor's degree in Law.

Both systems require you to do something after graduation before you
can write your bar exams and practise, a combination of courses and/or
apprenticeship (articling).

But of course, a US student at Oxford might have trouble finding an
articling position in the US, unless they majored in International
law.

And I don't know Oxford's tuition fees, but I'd venture they, like
Canadian universities, charge a foreign students a premium.

James
Rod Speed
2007-08-29 19:53:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by rick++
Post by Rod Speed
Most M.S students seem to work during their M.S. as a Teaching
Assistant/Reaearch Assistant though their field is also competitive.
Yeah, thats what I did, and it was a research degree too.
Australia wasnt it?
Yep.
Post by rick++
The UK-derived school systems often allow what
US calls professional studies as the first degree.
Yes they generally do.
Post by rick++
I was reading about an American who go a law degree at Oxford in three
years, which would have taken twice as long and fives times tuition in the US.
Oxford and Cambridge are rather different to the general run
of universitys with some different detail on that sort of thing.
John Weiss
2007-08-29 01:05:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
If someone turns 17 in May 08, starts college in Aug 08, at 22 he will
have spent 5 years in college, NOT three. I never stated I could get
B.S.+M.S in three, but FIVE. And yes, I have seen dozens of average
folks do that and several college
advisors told me their college allows that.
Post by cat
Most generic students who go for the BSN alone are lucky to finish in four,
what with all the prerequisites.
Really? I know folks who after their B.S. in a field like psychology,
get a B.S. in Nursing in one year(fast track program which involves
taking summer/winter classes which are truly hectic, but possible).
So, a normal 4 years for a BS in Psych + 1 more year for the BS in Nursing = 5
years... Also, you would have to make special arrangements to get all the
clinical work done, because many hospitals take in Student Nurses only at
specific times, and many schools are not very flexible in their clinical
schedules...
Post by s
Not all colleges. If you are getting a B.S in Nursing in some
campus(just from high school), you probably can get a M.S also in same
field in the same campus after you complete B.S.
Sure! And MANY employers won't hire such a nurse because he will expect too
high a salary because of his MS, yet have no experience in the field! Whether
a hospital will hire a CNA with no prior clinical experience is a hard
question, too! Anesthesia is a high-risk business, so an employer would likely
be looking for a level of experience that might be analogous to an MD
Anesthesiologist's 6-year residency...
Post by s
http://www.mymoneyblog.com/archives/2007/02/do-you-make-a-six-figure-salary-share-your-story.html
mentions someone
who who mentions that degree is useful in terms of cost/benefit. That
is what I was partly referring to. I regret you misunderstood me. But,
anyway thanks for your time.
You seem to be relying a lot on a single blog. I hope it doesn't warp your
sense of reality...
cat
2007-08-29 03:15:54 UTC
Permalink
"John Weiss" <jrweiss98155nospamatnospamcomcastdotnospamnet> wrote in
message
Post by John Weiss
Post by s
Not all colleges. If you are getting a B.S in Nursing in some
campus(just from high school), you probably can get a M.S also in same
field in the same campus after you complete B.S.
Sure! And MANY employers won't hire such a nurse because he will expect
too high a salary because of his MS, yet have no experience in the field!
Whether a hospital will hire a CNA with no prior clinical experience is a
hard question, too! Anesthesia is a high-risk business, so an employer
would likely be looking for a level of experience that might be analogous
to an MD Anesthesiologist's 6-year residency...
It doesn't even matter if an employer would hire the person. No school will
accept an applicant for CRNA without strong ICU and ER experience. They
can't just go straight through from high school and become a nurse
anesthetist. As for other MSNs with no clinical experience, they are a
joke.
Post by John Weiss
You seem to be relying a lot on a single blog. I hope it doesn't warp your
sense of reality...
I didn't realize the jerk was basing his entire plan on somebody's blog.
What a maroon.
cat
2007-08-29 03:10:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
Post by cat
You can't come out of high school and get a BS/MS in nursing in three years.
If someone turns 17 in May 08, starts college in Aug 08, at 22 he will
have spent 5 years in college, NOT three. I never stated I could get
B.S.+M.S in three, but FIVE. And yes, I have seen dozens of average
folks do that and several college
advisors told me their college allows that.
Really? You know *dozens* of students who've done this? I've been a nurse
for over 20 years and I don't know *any*.
Post by s
Post by cat
Most generic students who go for the BSN alone are lucky to finish in four,
what with all the prerequisites.
Really? I know folks who after their B.S. in a field like psychology,
get a B.S. in Nursing in one year(fast track program which involves
taking summer/winter classes which are truly hectic, but possible).
Was I talking about people who already had degrees??? No. See below.
Post by s
Post by cat
The BS/MS option is for nurses who have
already completed diplomas or associate's degrees in nursing and have
several years of nursing experience, or for generic students who already
have baccalaureate degrees.
Not all colleges. If you are getting a B.S in Nursing in some
campus(just from high school), you probably can get a M.S also in same
field in the same campus after you complete B.S.
Yes, that's true. But a BS/MS option (where baccalaureate and graduate
credits intermingle) are not for generic students.
Post by s
Post by cat
You also can't come out of nursing school and
go right into anesthesia school. CRNA programs are master's-level, BTW, not
certificates, and they all require experience in emergency room or intensive
care nursing prior to application.
I mentioned 2 years of work is required and that is what I intended by
work(though I did not clarify it)
Post by cat
Admissions are highly competitive, and
students are strongly discouraged from working while they go to school due
to the intensity of the programs, so even with the stipend that some
programs offer, financial stability is crucial.
World is competitive and these fields are no different. Most M.S
students seem to work during their M.S. as a Teaching Assistant/
Reaearch Assistant though their field is also competitive.
If you are truly a teenager, you don't have a fucking clue what is involved,
either with work, the world, or nursing. Lose the condescension,
grasshopper. You haven't earned the right.
Post by s
Post by cat
And anyone who thinks nursing is a low-stress job is truly either a troll or
a complete moron.
No job is stress free. Low stress is relative. I was referring their
job is 60-70 not 80-90 as investment bankers/surgeons, though it
depends on your employer a lot. Your advice might be useful for
someone who might have no idea about nursing.
That would be you, asshole. You haven't any idea what nursing involves.
Given the history of the profession, the idea that you want to go into it
for the money is hysterical.

You talk a good game, but in reality, you're an idiot and a troll. I regret
that you were born.
pc
2007-08-29 21:02:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by cat
Post by s
Post by cat
You can't come out of high school and get a BS/MS in nursing in three years.
If someone turns 17 in May 08, starts college in Aug 08, at 22 he will
have spent 5 years in college, NOT three. I never stated I could get
B.S.+M.S in three, but FIVE. And yes, I have seen dozens of average
folks do that and several college
advisors told me their college allows that.
Really? You know *dozens* of students who've done this? I've been a nurse
for over 20 years and I don't know *any*.
Post by s
Post by cat
Most generic students who go for the BSN alone are lucky to finish in four,
what with all the prerequisites.
Really? I know folks who after their B.S. in a field like psychology,
get a B.S. in Nursing in one year(fast track program which involves
taking summer/winter classes which are truly hectic, but possible).
Was I talking about people who already had degrees??? No. See below.
Post by s
Post by cat
The BS/MS option is for nurses who have
already completed diplomas or associate's degrees in nursing and have
several years of nursing experience, or for generic students who already
have baccalaureate degrees.
Not all colleges. If you are getting a B.S in Nursing in some
campus(just from high school), you probably can get a M.S also in same
field in the same campus after you complete B.S.
Yes, that's true. But a BS/MS option (where baccalaureate and graduate
credits intermingle) are not for generic students.
Post by s
Post by cat
You also can't come out of nursing school and
go right into anesthesia school. CRNA programs are master's-level, BTW, not
certificates, and they all require experience in emergency room or intensive
care nursing prior to application.
I mentioned 2 years of work is required and that is what I intended by
work(though I did not clarify it)
Post by cat
Admissions are highly competitive, and
students are strongly discouraged from working while they go to school due
to the intensity of the programs, so even with the stipend that some
programs offer, financial stability is crucial.
World is competitive and these fields are no different. Most M.S
students seem to work during their M.S. as a Teaching Assistant/
Reaearch Assistant though their field is also competitive.
If you are truly a teenager, you don't have a fucking clue what is involved,
either with work, the world, or nursing. Lose the condescension,
grasshopper. You haven't earned the right.
Post by s
Post by cat
And anyone who thinks nursing is a low-stress job is truly either a troll or
a complete moron.
No job is stress free. Low stress is relative. I was referring their
job is 60-70 not 80-90 as investment bankers/surgeons, though it
depends on your employer a lot. Your advice might be useful for
someone who might have no idea about nursing.
That would be you, asshole. You haven't any idea what nursing involves.
Given the history of the profession, the idea that you want to go into it
for the money is hysterical.
You talk a good game, but in reality, you're an idiot and a troll. I regret
that you were born.
Is that you Renee?
If so, big wave HI. Hope all is well.

..PC
Nicik Name
2007-08-30 00:55:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by s
I will be completing high school in May 08 and I will be 17 then.
Who is your ghost writer?
What spell checker?
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