Discussion:
Watered-down Meats
(too old to reply)
Jon von Leipzig
2005-03-09 21:51:09 UTC
Permalink
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
so I bought a slice of "ham" @$2.92 per lb.
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!

Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??

Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox meat
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.

Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).

Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?

<Jon K>
(wondering if there's water in other meats/fish, but never noticed)
Serendipity
2005-03-09 23:10:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Not here.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox meat
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Again, a not here. Chicken parts are that, chicken parts, no water or
anything else added!
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
<Jon K>
(wondering if there's water in other meats/fish, but never noticed)
bicycle
2005-03-09 23:27:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Not here.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox meat
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Again, a not here. Chicken parts are that, chicken parts, no water or
anything else added!
Unless you're buying Tyson and/or from Wal-Mart.

<http://www.ediets.com/news/printArticle.cfm?cmi=285776>

Also note "not all enhanced products are sold prepackaged. Some are
displayed unwrapped in meat cases."
Joel M. Eichen
2005-03-09 23:29:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never
noticed
Post by Jon von Leipzig
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor
(god
Some chicken parts are frozen then sold chock full of water ......
Serendipity
2005-03-10 00:03:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Not here.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox
meat
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never
noticed
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor
(god
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
knows it needs it).
Again, a not here. Chicken parts are that, chicken parts, no water
or
Post by Serendipity
anything else added!
Unless you're buying Tyson and/or from Wal-Mart.
Sorry, I don't live in the US and do buy from those stores unless
visiting the US. At any rate, I certainly wouldn't buy meat from
either. When I buy chicken I get chicken, nothing else. It works for me :)
Post by Jon von Leipzig
<http://www.ediets.com/news/printArticle.cfm?cmi=285776>
Also note "not all enhanced products are sold prepackaged. Some are
displayed unwrapped in meat cases."
bicycle
2005-03-10 00:40:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Not here.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox
meat
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never
noticed
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor
(god
Post by Serendipity
Post by Jon von Leipzig
knows it needs it).
Again, a not here. Chicken parts are that, chicken parts, no water
or
Post by Serendipity
anything else added!
Unless you're buying Tyson and/or from Wal-Mart.
Sorry, I don't live in the US and do buy from those stores unless
visiting the US. At any rate, I certainly wouldn't buy meat from
either. When I buy chicken I get chicken, nothing else. It works for me :)
In Canada you have worry about cattle and pig proteins in your
chicken.
b***@hotmail.com
2005-03-09 23:16:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
What is even worse finding your water is 23% ham?

-Tom
Joel M. Eichen
2005-03-09 23:25:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
What is even worse finding your water is 23% ham?
-Tom
Yup a couple of rabbis I know are fighting mad about it.
Robert Morien
2005-03-09 23:55:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@hotmail.com
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
What is even worse finding your water is 23% ham?
-Tom
What's worse is finding that 23% of posts are from Joel Eichen
Tock
2005-03-10 03:08:42 UTC
Permalink
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed this
before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Kroger had a sale on its frozen chicken breasts a while ago, and I bought a
few packages . . . but the stuff was chuck full of added liquids, and I
couldn't bring myself to eat more than half of one. That stuff is just
awful . . .
Anymore, I double check to make sure I don't buy anything that's been
adulterated.
-Tock
Lucy
2005-03-10 03:55:17 UTC
Permalink
I'm in the U.S. (Texas) and there are plenty of places to buy unaltered
meat..
Whole Foods Market is the one I shop at. They have meat that not only has no
broth or saline solution added, but also no rBGH, rBST... just meat. Imagine
that!
They also sell organic meat.. which includes the above, plus the animals are
raised on land that has not been blasted with pesticides for.. I forget the
number of years...but I think it's 5 yrs prior to the animals being put on
there.
There is a huge difference in taste in their meats.. and veggies as well.
lucy
Post by Tock
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Kroger had a sale on its frozen chicken breasts a while ago, and I bought
a few packages . . . but the stuff was chuck full of added liquids, and I
couldn't bring myself to eat more than half of one. That stuff is just
awful . . .
Anymore, I double check to make sure I don't buy anything that's been
adulterated.
-Tock
j***@hotmail.com
2005-03-11 04:41:26 UTC
Permalink
lucy..about WHOLE foods.. is all the meat there good i.e . like the
ones which u mention with no "They have meat that not only has no
broth or saline solution added, but also no rBGH, rBST" or do I have
to search for them in a particular section.
Lucy
2005-03-11 06:17:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@hotmail.com
lucy..about WHOLE foods.. is all the meat there good i.e . like the
ones which u mention with no "They have meat that not only has no
broth or saline solution added, but also no rBGH, rBST" or do I have
to search for them in a particular section.
jkutti,
Great question!
The store I go to.. the meat counter is just up from the produce
section. And, it is right there, clearly labeled. Also.. the guys working
the meat counter have always been friendly and helpful to me. They even give
out their business cards, and encourage you to call or email! They had a
great variety too.. this is definitely not a local Kroger. hehe..
I have tried.. chicken/feta/spinach sausage.. buffalo.. etc.
Below, I pasted a portion from their website
and there is more info (that I didn't paste) regarding food safety, and that
they perform routine microbiological tests on the meat.. etc. That is their
"natural" meat. When you get to the meat counter, you'll also see organic
free range, kosher dressed (I don't even want to get into that.. it can be
gross!) My first visit, I just asked.. they were very nice.
I also noticed a marked difference in how much energy I have when I
started shopping exclusively at Whole Foods also.. and no, I'm not a
stockholder! hehe
Ok.. I'll stop rambling.. but I really do love this store. They have a
little hot lunch area too, and salad bar!
Good luck, and let us know how you liked it!
lucy :)

(Pasted from www.wholefoodsmarket.com)
The Whole Foods Market standards for natural meat and poultry go far beyond
what the U.S. Department of Agriculture requires for labeling meat or
poultry as "natural." All of our meat and poultry offerings are minimally
processed with no artificial additives or preservatives (as required by the
USDA for "natural" labeling). In addition, Whole Foods Market goes even
further by strictly monitoring how the animals are raised and what the
animals are fed. Our standards ensure that the meat and poultry we sell are:
a.. Raised without added hormones.
b.. Raised without antibiotics.
c.. Never fed animal by-products.
d.. Raised by farmers and ranchers who care about the animals and the
environment in which they live.
e.. Closely monitored by Whole Foods Market from the farm to our stores to
ensure compliance with our strict animal welfare and food safety quality
standards.
Jon von Leipzig
2005-03-11 15:56:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucy
Post by j***@hotmail.com
lucy..about WHOLE foods.. is all the meat there good i.e . like the
ones which u mention with no "They have meat that not only has no
broth or saline solution added, but also no rBGH, rBST" or do I have
to search for them in a particular section.
jkutti,
Great question!
The store I go to.. the meat counter is just up from the produce
section. And, it is right there, clearly labeled. Also.. the guys working
the meat counter have always been friendly and helpful to me. They even give
out their business cards, and encourage you to call or email! They had a
great variety too.. this is definitely not a local Kroger. hehe..
I have tried.. chicken/feta/spinach sausage.. buffalo.. etc.
Below, I pasted a portion from their website
and there is more info (that I didn't paste) regarding food safety, and that
they perform routine microbiological tests on the meat.. etc. That is their
"natural" meat. When you get to the meat counter, you'll also see organic
free range, kosher dressed (I don't even want to get into that.. it can be
gross!) My first visit, I just asked.. they were very nice.
I also noticed a marked difference in how much energy I have when I
started shopping exclusively at Whole Foods also.. and no, I'm not a
stockholder! hehe
Ok.. I'll stop rambling.. but I really do love this store. They have a
little hot lunch area too, and salad bar!
Good luck, and let us know how you liked it!
lucy :)
(Pasted from www.wholefoodsmarket.com)
The Whole Foods Market standards for natural meat and poultry go far beyond
what the U.S. Department of Agriculture requires for labeling meat or
poultry as "natural." All of our meat and poultry offerings are minimally
processed with no artificial additives or preservatives (as required by the
USDA for "natural" labeling). In addition, Whole Foods Market goes even
further by strictly monitoring how the animals are raised and what the
a.. Raised without added hormones.
b.. Raised without antibiotics.
c.. Never fed animal by-products.
d.. Raised by farmers and ranchers who care about the animals and the
environment in which they live.
e.. Closely monitored by Whole Foods Market from the farm to our stores to
ensure compliance with our strict animal welfare and food safety quality
standards.
Sorry, but I wasn't energized paying outrageous prices for things not
labeled organic.

Just for starters, next time check the price on ancho chiles,
(conventionally grown). When you get over the Sticker Shock, then go to
a Mexican store, buy em for about $4.00 per lb.

trivia: These organic sprout growers, (sproutpeopledahtcom) claimed they
couldn't sell to Whole Foods, cuz they required all organic sprouts to
be dipped in bleach (worried about salmonella, no doubt)

Oh, right...."strictly monitoring" how the animals are raised.....ask em
how large of a (Food)Police Force they have... <yawn>
Dennis
2005-03-10 16:43:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tock
Kroger had a sale on its frozen chicken breasts a while ago, and I bought a
few packages . . . but the stuff was chuck full of added liquids, and I
couldn't bring myself to eat more than half of one. That stuff is just
awful . . .
Um, Tock, you're supposed to thaw and cook them first...

Dennis (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally
Gary Heston
2005-03-10 04:14:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Seems like all the bacon I buy is at least 50% water. There's certainly
not enough grease left to equal the weight of the cooked bacon.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox meat
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
I don't know about China, but I do see corned beef imported from Brazil
and Argentina.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Actually, what suprises me about what you're seeing is that you're
getting a percentage content--I don't think I've ever seen anything
other than "water added" locally.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
No. It increases risk of contamination, but doesn't improve the product
at all.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
<Jon K>
(wondering if there's water in other meats/fish, but never noticed)
Yes. Start reading the fine print.


Gary
--
Gary Heston ***@hiwaay.net

Windows is like SUVs; a bad idea, poorly implemented, unsafe, with a
lot of intept users, but a fact of life we have to put up with.
h***@hotmail.com
2005-03-10 06:13:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary Heston
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
No. It increases risk of contamination, but doesn't improve the product
at all.
I don't know, I've had some ham that had more the texture of shoe
leather than meat. A little water injected into it would have helped.
freeisbest
2005-03-10 15:50:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by Gary Heston
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
No. It increases risk of contamination, but doesn't improve the product
at all.
I don't know, I've had some ham that had more the texture of shoe
leather than meat. A little water injected into it would have
helped.

Improperly cooked real meat is somewhat chewy unless the critter is a
pore little baby. Thus the use of female hormones to make meat soft,
plump, fatty, and moist. The water added above that is the result of
the marketers' breakthrough discovery that water is cheaper than
protein.

I was around when they turned on the water hose - at the time, they
apologetically injected 1.5% and 3% water into meat, with a lot of
defensive explanations about how it 'improved' the meat, and a lot of
loud comsumer complaint.
Now it's 23% useless water, and take-it-or-leave-it?
Thanks for reminder, I need to call our local organic chicken guys
and order a couple of chewy little chickens; I 'enhance flavor and
moistness' by cooking them.
Lucy
2005-03-10 18:09:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by Gary Heston
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they
would add
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by Gary Heston
Post by Jon von Leipzig
so much water to ham?
No. It increases risk of contamination, but doesn't improve the
product
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by Gary Heston
at all.
I don't know, I've had some ham that had more the texture of shoe
leather than meat. A little water injected into it would have
helped.
Improperly cooked real meat is somewhat chewy unless the critter is a
pore little baby. Thus the use of female hormones to make meat soft,
plump, fatty, and moist. The water added above that is the result of
the marketers' breakthrough discovery that water is cheaper than
protein.
I was around when they turned on the water hose - at the time, they
apologetically injected 1.5% and 3% water into meat, with a lot of
defensive explanations about how it 'improved' the meat, and a lot of
loud comsumer complaint.
Now it's 23% useless water, and take-it-or-leave-it?
Thanks for reminder, I need to call our local organic chicken guys
and order a couple of chewy little chickens; I 'enhance flavor and
moistness' by cooking them.
Oh man.. I truly do wish water were the only difference between organic free
range chicken, and conventional. Sadly.. there are many, none healthy for us
to be eating as often as we do. I will not get on a soapbox.. that usually
takes me about four paragraphs <grin>.. but they are fed garbage, and kept
in an unsanitary manner, then fed chemicals too. And people wonder why there
is more colon cancer these days.. duh.
lucy
quietguy
2005-03-11 12:45:08 UTC
Permalink
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water - over
90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that is pretty
good really

David
Lucy
2005-03-11 13:14:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by quietguy
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water - over
90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that is pretty
good really
David
David,
It is difficult to tell in newsgroups if someone is being serious, or
tongue-in-cheek.
I'm going to assume you're kidding around.. and not comparing flesh from a
dead animal to a living being. heh
lucy :)
diddy
2005-03-11 13:18:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucy
Post by quietguy
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water -
over 90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that
is pretty good really
David
David,
It is difficult to tell in newsgroups if someone is being serious, or
tongue-in-cheek.
I'm going to assume you're kidding around.. and not comparing flesh
from a dead animal to a living being. heh
lucy :)
I've been reading this and smiling. I butcher my own meats. We do NOT add
water to them. Yet when I cook these meats, I'm always surprised at the
amount of water left in the pan if you put the lid on to keep moisture from
boiling away.
quietguy
2005-03-12 07:16:45 UTC
Permalink
Seriously, for a minute - I do think that both animals and people are largely
'made' of water - eg look at biltong or jerky for instance and see how much it
shrinks in volume when the water is removed by drying.

But of course this probably has no relevence to the original post

David
Post by diddy
Post by Lucy
Post by quietguy
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water -
over 90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that
is pretty good really
David
David,
It is difficult to tell in newsgroups if someone is being serious, or
tongue-in-cheek.
I'm going to assume you're kidding around.. and not comparing flesh
from a dead animal to a living being. heh
lucy :)
I've been reading this and smiling. I butcher my own meats. We do NOT add
water to them. Yet when I cook these meats, I'm always surprised at the
amount of water left in the pan if you put the lid on to keep moisture from
boiling away.
quietguy
2005-03-12 07:13:38 UTC
Permalink
Yep, just kidding around - you sussed me out there.

David
Post by Lucy
Post by quietguy
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water - over
90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that is pretty
good really
David
David,
It is difficult to tell in newsgroups if someone is being serious, or
tongue-in-cheek.
I'm going to assume you're kidding around.. and not comparing flesh from a
dead animal to a living being. heh
lucy :)
Joel M. Eichen
2005-03-11 13:15:18 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 23:45:08 +1100, quietguy
Post by quietguy
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water - over
90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that is pretty
good really
David
YUP, this is because animals do not take showers every morning .......
Lucy
2005-03-11 13:20:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel M. Eichen
On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 23:45:08 +1100, quietguy
Post by quietguy
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water - over
90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that is pretty
good really
David
YUP, this is because animals do not take showers every morning .......
LOL!!
lucy
quietguy
2005-03-12 07:18:03 UTC
Permalink
WHAT? You make yours have a bath!!

David
Post by Joel M. Eichen
YUP, this is because animals do not take showers every morning .......
Jon von Leipzig
2005-03-12 15:09:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel M. Eichen
On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 23:45:08 +1100, quietguy
Post by quietguy
I thought I read somewhere that we humans were mostly made of water - over
90% or something like that - so if animal meat is only 25% that is pretty
good really
David
YUP, this is because animals do not take showers every morning .......
Cuz their instincts tell them it's not healthy to inhale chlorinated
water in the shower.
(plus it dries out their skin....making them less attractive for mating)

hth
Amber Gibson
2005-03-12 23:49:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Cuz their instincts tell them it's not healthy to inhale chlorinated
water in the shower.
(plus it dries out their skin....making them less attractive for mating)
hth
ironic - in humans, NOT bathing makes them less attractive for mating :P
Dennis
2005-03-10 16:46:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I don't know, I've had some ham that had more the texture of shoe
leather than meat. A little water injected into it would have helped.
I've told you before -- you've got to stop grocery shopping at Thom
McAnn's.

Dennis (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally
Jon von Leipzig
2005-03-11 15:34:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by Gary Heston
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
No. It increases risk of contamination, but doesn't improve the product
at all.
I don't know, I've had some ham that had more the texture of shoe
leather than meat. A little water injected into it would have helped.
That's what I thought, on the big hams it might help to add some water.
I've seen the "water added" whole hams, but never paid attention to how
much was added, cuz I've never had reason to buy one.
Jon von Leipzig
2005-03-11 15:31:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary Heston
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Seems like all the bacon I buy is at least 50% water. There's certainly
not enough grease left to equal the weight of the cooked bacon.
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox meat
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
I don't know about China, but I do see corned beef imported from Brazil
and Argentina.
Next time, I'll get the ham mfg's name & call them . I need to know how
they arrived at the "sweet spot" of 23%.
Post by Gary Heston
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed
this before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Actually, what suprises me about what you're seeing is that you're
getting a percentage content--I don't think I've ever seen anything
other than "water added" locally.
Maybe it's state laws. Just checked at Publix, (Florida chain, which
invaded Jawja) Even their house brand of chicken sez 5% water added.
They didn't have the same brand of sliced ham as Walmart, they had
Smithfield. The large store label completely obscured the "fine print",
on all the pkgs.
(informed consumers are hazardous to the bottom line...??)
Chloe
2005-03-10 12:54:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox meat
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed this
before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
I think in some cases the water is actually a saline solution, which would
enhance flavor (in some people's opinion, anyway) and act as a preservative.

I can't tell from your post how the ham was packaged, but I know grocery
delis sell ham with water added and without water added--and the stuff with
water is a lot cheaper on per pound price. Actually I think some of it
tastes pretty good in sandwiches. But for cooking, since the water will cook
out you could well be better off buying a higher-priced but better quality
product. And of course it's obvious that if you're looking for nutritional
value you'd have to eat 23% more of the adulterated product than the
nonadulterated to come out the same.

The industry tries to make a selling point that adding broth or other liquid
content to those horrible skinless boneless chicken breasts makes them less
dry and tastier. I have my doubts. However, it should be possible in most
decent sized supermarkets to find meat with no water added if that's what
you prefer.

If you're willing to go to the extra time and trouble, try buying smoked ham
hocks to flavor your beans. Put them in a big pot, mostly cover with water,
and simmer slowly until the meat falls off the bone. Let them cool, then get
rid of the bone and fat and pull the meat apart with your fingers and add it
to the soup. The broth will flavor your soup nicely, too, and if you cool it
in the fridge you can easily remove the hardened fat from the top.
SoCalMike
2005-03-11 01:58:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chloe
The industry tries to make a selling point that adding broth or other liquid
content to those horrible skinless boneless chicken breasts makes them less
dry and tastier. I have my doubts.
you can do it yourself, by "brining" the meat. ive brined chicken before
in a salt/water/garlic solution before grilling. tastes much better and
juicier.
Don K
2005-03-11 02:43:55 UTC
Permalink
The industry tries to make a selling point that adding broth or other liquid content to those
horrible skinless boneless chicken breasts makes them less dry and tastier. I have my doubts.
you can do it yourself, by "brining" the meat. ive brined chicken before in a salt/water/garlic
solution before grilling. tastes much better and juicier.
I've never understood why some people prefer meat that is juicy.
Personally, I like it drier. For instance I prefer chicken breast
meat sliced 1/4 inch thick rather than 1/2 inch.

Juicy chicken meat reminds me of KFC.

Don
Jon von Leipzig
2005-03-11 15:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chloe
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Couldn't find the small pkgs of ham, used for flavoring bean soups,
Was a bit outraged when I got home, noticed it was labeled
"ham & water product" with a whopping _23%_ water!!
Anyone know if this 23% is the norm??
Has it always been this high, or is there a "water creep" in ham??
Maybe it was a cheap Chinese import....with some water buffalo/ox meat
mixed in....
my punishment for shopping at Slavemart.
Then I read the label on my chicken thighs. I know I've never noticed this
before: "up to 12% broth" !!
It's somewhat understandable, if the broth would enhance the flavor (god
knows it needs it).
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
I think in some cases the water is actually a saline solution, which would
enhance flavor (in some people's opinion, anyway) and act as a preservative.
I've heard that...but I don't think it needs to be 23%.
Post by Chloe
I can't tell from your post how the ham was packaged, but I know grocery
delis sell ham with water added and without water added--and the stuff with
water is a lot cheaper on per pound price. Actually I think some of it
tastes pretty good in sandwiches. But for cooking, since the water will cook
out you could well be better off buying a higher-priced but better quality
product. And of course it's obvious that if you're looking for nutritional
value you'd have to eat 23% more of the adulterated product than the
nonadulterated to come out the same.
As I (almost) never buy ham, I didn't shop around in the store. I was
just looking for something cheap for soup. When I spotted the slices, I
figured I could "multi task" with it. Soup, sandwich, breakfast, etc.
(it was a space-saver....shrinks up nicely)
Post by Chloe
The industry tries to make a selling point that adding broth or other liquid
content to those horrible skinless boneless chicken breasts makes them less
dry and tastier. I have my doubts. However, it should be possible in most
decent sized supermarkets to find meat with no water added if that's what
you prefer.
Probably can find meats w/out water. I've never noticed they were doing
it with chicken. I'll know today, if this "12% broth" chicken tastes any
better.
Post by Chloe
If you're willing to go to the extra time and trouble, try buying smoked ham
hocks to flavor your beans. Put them in a big pot, mostly cover with water,
and simmer slowly until the meat falls off the bone. Let them cool, then get
rid of the bone and fat and pull the meat apart with your fingers and add it
to the soup. The broth will flavor your soup nicely, too, and if you cool it
in the fridge you can easily remove the hardened fat from the top.
No trouble at all, here in the Sawth........smoked ham hocks are
everywhere.

I'll be darned....I'll try this next time...thanx!
Don't know why..but for some reason I always assumed the smoked wouldn't
impart flavor in soup.
(I'm stuck with bean soup, the only one I've ever mastered)

<Jon K>
George
2005-03-11 16:11:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chloe
Post by Jon von Leipzig
Other than to increase profits, is there any other reason they would add
so much water to ham?
I think in some cases the water is actually a saline solution, which would
enhance flavor (in some people's opinion, anyway) and act as a preservative.
The raw pork needs to have a saline solution added before it is smoked.
That and the smoking is what makes it ham. The extra water is added to
be able to sell water for the price of ham or lower the per pound price
to make people think they are getting a bargain.

Anything that is labelled "xxxx product" is something that has been
adulterated. If you think about the "ham" in question it says "ham and
water product". They is a clear statement that you are getting ham
(which already has a certain, necessary amount of water added) and water.
Post by Chloe
I can't tell from your post how the ham was packaged, but I know grocery
delis sell ham with water added and without water added--and the stuff with
water is a lot cheaper on per pound price. Actually I think some of it
tastes pretty good in sandwiches. But for cooking, since the water will cook
out you could well be better off buying a higher-priced but better quality
product. And of course it's obvious that if you're looking for nutritional
value you'd have to eat 23% more of the adulterated product than the
nonadulterated to come out the same.
The industry tries to make a selling point that adding broth or other liquid
content to those horrible skinless boneless chicken breasts makes them less
dry and tastier. I have my doubts. However, it should be possible in most
decent sized supermarkets to find meat with no water added if that's what
you prefer.
If you're willing to go to the extra time and trouble, try buying smoked ham
hocks to flavor your beans. Put them in a big pot, mostly cover with water,
and simmer slowly until the meat falls off the bone. Let them cool, then get
rid of the bone and fat and pull the meat apart with your fingers and add it
to the soup. The broth will flavor your soup nicely, too, and if you cool it
in the fridge you can easily remove the hardened fat from the top.
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